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Demonstrators protest against the Citizenship Amendment Act near Jamia Millia Islamia on Dec. 15 in New Delhi. Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

'Our Democracy Is In Danger': Muslims In India Say Police Target Them With Violence

Dozens of Indians, most of them Muslim, have been killed by police in weeks of nationwide protests against a new citizenship law. Their families believe they were singled out because of their faith.

'Our Democracy Is In Danger': Muslims In India Say Police Target Them With Violence

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In this image take from NASA video, astronauts Christina Koch, left, moves away as Jessica Meir, right, exits a hatch as they prepare to install batteries for the International Space Station's solar power grid during a space walk, Monday, Jan. 20. AP hide caption

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AP

Astronauts Finish Spacewalk For Final Fix Of International Space Station Device

Two astronauts aboard the International Space Station made their fourth foray outside the spacecraft to prolong the lifespan of a cosmic ray detector.

Damage at the al-Asad military base in Iraq, days after a missile attack by Iran. The barrage was in retaliation for the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general in a drone strike in Baghdad on Jan. 3. Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images

Pentagon Says 34 U.S. Troops Suffered Brain Injuries From Iranian Missile Strike

More than half the American troops diagnosed with concussions were transferred from the Iraqi base that was attacked to Germany or the U.S.

Lien's drawing of North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr with a fidget spinner. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

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Kisha Ravi/NPR

Sketch Artist Captures 'Something Unusual' At Senate Trial

Art Lien, a courtroom artist who normally covers the Supreme Court, has been sketching the Senate proceedings. "I'm looking for color," he says — such as sleeping senators and fidget spinners.

Sketch Artist Captures 'Something Unusual' At Senate Trial

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Protesters wearing Sardines, figurines and banners join the first national rally organized by the Sardine Movement in San Giovanni Square, on Dec. 14, 2019 in Rome. Alessandra Benedetti/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Alessandra Benedetti/Corbis via Getty Images

Regional Elections In Italy: Can The 'Sardines' Win Against Populism?

European Union officials will be closely monitoring results of the local votes on Sunday that are seen as a bellwether for the fate of the national government.

Hank Bolden, shown here at The Hartt School, is an atomic veteran — one of thousands of soldiers present at secret U.S. nuclear weapons tests that took place during the Cold War. Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public Radio hide caption

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Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public Radio

6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

Connecticut Public Radio

Hank Bolden is one of thousands of U.S. soldiers exposed to secret nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s. He's now using compensation money from the federal government to focus on his first love: music.

6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

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In this July 27, 1974, file photo, Rep. Thomas Railsback, R-Ill., right, confers with chairman Peter Rodino, D-N.J., during the House Judiciary Committee's debate on impeachment articles drafted against President Richard Nixon. AP hide caption

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AP

Remembering A Congressman Who Bucked His Party On An Impeachment

Tom Railsback, former Republican representative from Illinois who died this week at age 87, played a memorable role in the impeachment process of President Richard Nixon.

Remembering A Congressman Who Bucked His Party On An Impeachment

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Roughly 1 in 10 infants were born prematurely in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drug Makena is widely prescribed to women at high risk of going into labor early, though the latest research suggests the medicine doesn't work. Luis Davilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Davilla/Getty Images

Drug To Prevent Premature Birth Divides Doctors, Insurers And FDA Experts

Kaiser Health News

An expert panel convened by the FDA says the drug Makena should be withdrawn from the market because a review of its effectiveness shows it doesn't work. But OB-GYNS who prescribe the drug disagree.

Beth Novey/NPR

'Interior Chinatown' Puts That Guy In The Background Front And Center

Charles Yu's new novel follows a TV actor who often gets stuck playing generic Asian men. Yu says he was inspired by shows that set episodes in Chinatown — but keep Asian actors in the background.

'Interior Chinatown' Puts That Guy In The Background Front And Center

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(L-R) Tanya, Rachel and Petra Haden. "We usually just naturally gravitate towards a harmony," Tanya says. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

On Their Latest Album, The Haden Triplets Sing 'The Family Songbook'

The daughters of accomplished upright bassist Charlie Haden have reached back even further for inspiration on their latest album, drawing influence from the country roots of their grandfather.

On Their Latest Album, The Haden Triplets Sing 'The Family Songbook'

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Tank and the Bangas perform with Cuban singer Cimafunk, the Soul Rebels and The Queen of the Guardians in Havana, Cuba. Eliana Aponte/NPR hide caption

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Eliana Aponte/NPR

Tank And The Cubans: A Week In Havana

The 2017 winners of the Tiny Desk Contest travel to Havana with NOLA's The Soul Rebels to connect with Cimafunk, Cuban musicians and history.

Tank And The Cubans: A Week In Havana

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Suspended Recording Academy president and CEO Deborah Dugan, speaking at the 62nd Grammy Awards nomination event in New York in November. John Lamparski/WireImage hide caption

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John Lamparski/WireImage

The Cloud Over The Grammys: Allegations Of Sexual Misconduct, Vote Rigging

The Grammy Awards telecast is airing Sunday evening. The Recording Academy says that nothing should overshadow the night, but allegations from its ousted female president and CEO suggest otherwise.

The Cloud Over The Grammys: Allegations Of Sexual Misconduct, Vote Rigging

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Anti-abortion rights activists march toward the U.S. Supreme Court during the 2019 March for Life in Washington, D.C. President Trump spoke at this year's rally on Friday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

President Trump Faces Friendly Crowd At March For Life

Trump has addressed the annual march remotely before, but Friday marked the first time a sitting president has spoken in person at the anti-abortion rights event.

President Trump Faces Friendly Crowd At March For Life

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Editor's Pick

In this pool photo of a Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, defendant Ali Abdul Aziz Ali, also known as Ammar al-Baluchi, attends his pretrial hearing along with other Sept. 11 defendants at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in 2014. Janet Hamlin, Pool/AP hide caption

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Janet Hamlin, Pool/AP

CIA Used Prisoner As 'Training Prop' For Torture, Psychologist Testifies

James Mitchell testified at a trial at Guantanamo that a man accused of helping finance the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks was subjected to "excessive" abuse.

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