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A housing development sits nestled in the South Mountain foothills in the Ahwatukee neighborhood, in Phoenix, Ariz. The city saw the biggest jump in population in the U.S. between 2017 and 2018. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

South And West Continue Rapid Growth, According To New Population Data

The fastest growing cities are in Arizona, Texas, Washington and North Carolina. Columbus, Ohio, is the only Midwestern city in the top 15 fastest-growing populations.

Sam Smith, Brittany Smith and their daughter Erelah outside their Charlotte home. The Smiths moved to Charlotte looking for change and opportunity. They are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg County, where the African American population has ballooned by 64% since 2000. Swikar Patel for NPR hide caption

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Swikar Patel for NPR

As Employment Rises, African American Transplants Ride Jobs Wave To The South

At a time of low unemployment for African Americans, educated, well-connected professionals are starting new lives in cities such as Charlotte, N.C.

As Employment Rises, African American Transplants Ride Jobs Wave To The South

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Denise Brinley is Executive Director at Pennsylvania Governor's Office of Energy. The state produces "playbooks" to highlight ways old coal power plant sites could be redeveloped. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Finding New Opportunity For Old Coal-Fired Power Plant Sites

Coal-fired power plants keep closing and communities around the country must decide what to do with those sites. Pennsylvania has a plan, aiming to create new jobs where the old ones have been lost.

Darrell Patterson, a devout Seventh Day Adventist, says he was fired after he refused to work on Saturday. Dan Weber/Courtesy General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists hide caption

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Dan Weber/Courtesy General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists

How The Fight For Religious Freedom Has Fallen Victim To The Culture Wars

Disputes over LGBT rights and religion's role in public life have derailed a previously non-partisan movement.

How The Fight For Religious Freedom Has Fallen Victim To The Culture Wars

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Many of the survivors of the Clotilda voyage are buried in Old Plateau Cemetery near Mobile, Ala. The Alabama Historical Commission announced Wednesday that researchers have identified the vessel after months of work. Julie Bennett/AP hide caption

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Julie Bennett/AP

Alabama Historians Say The Last Known Slave Ship To U.S. Has Been Found

The Clotilda carried 110 people from present-day Benin to the shores of Mobile in 1860, despite the import of slaves being illegal. Researchers told their descendants about the discovery first.

Joel Ross performs at Lantaren Venster on May 2, 2019 in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Peter Van Breukelen/Redferns hide caption

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Peter Van Breukelen/Redferns

Joel Ross And His (Exceptionally) Good Vibes

The vibraphonist has a "love-hate relationship" with his instrument that has been helpful in perfecting his craft — but it wouldn't mean much without the deep emotional well he pulls from.

Joel Ross And His (Exceptionally) Good Vibes

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Kenneth Feinberg, pictured in 2014 at a Senate Commerce subcommittee hearing in the wake of GM ignition switch recalls, has been appointed to oversee talks between Bayer's lawyers and plaintiffs' representatives. Lauren Victoria Burke/AP hide caption

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Lauren Victoria Burke/AP

Kenneth Feinberg To Mediate Roundup Settlement Talks Between Bayer And Plaintiffs

The prominent attorney has been tapped to facilitate talks between the company's lawyers and plaintiffs' representatives over the next two weeks.

Lina and Walid Alhathloul, sister and brother of jailed Saudi activist Loujain Alhathloul, have had a busy schedule in the United States raising awareness about their sister's plight. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

'Won't Give Up': Siblings Of Jailed Saudi Women's Rights Activist Speak Out In U.S.

It's been a year since Loujain Alhathloul was detained in Saudi Arabia for pushing for women's rights. A PEN award for her and two other Saudi activists has helped bring their plight back to light.

'Won't Give Up': Siblings Of Jailed Saudi Women's Rights Activist Speak Out In U.S.

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