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Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, announced new guidelines on Wednesday for critical infrastructure workers who may have been exposed to the coronavirus to return to work. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

White House Announces New Guidance For How Critical Employees Can Return To Work

The new rules apply only to workers in critical infrastructure jobs, a broadly defined group that includes employees in fields from health care to financial services.

Health care workers feel unprotected from the disease they're supposed to treat. pablohart/Getty Images hide caption

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pablohart/Getty Images

'It's Like Walking Into Chernobyl,' One Doctor Says Of Her Emergency Room

Some health care workers say they're exhausted and burning out from the stress of treating a stream of critically ill patients in an increasingly overstretched health care system.

'It's Like Walking Into Chernobyl,' One Doctor Says Of Her Emergency Room

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Tony Doré wears a face mask as baguettes cool in his bakery in Paris' 15th arrondissement. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

'Boulangeries Are Helping Us Make It Through': In France, Bakeries Remain Essential

In a country that consumes 10 billion baguettes every year, "If the bakeries started closing, people would be unnerved," says Paris baker Tony Doré. His boulangerie now stays open seven days a week.

'Boulangeries Are Helping Us Make It Through': In France, Bakeries Remain Essential

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Governments, like businesses and other organizations, are working remotely and holding online meetings. They're also falling victim to harassment. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

'Zoombombing' City Hall: Online Harassment Surges As Public Meetings Go Virtual

Racist and pornographic attacks on video conferences are a problem for anyone holding online meetings, but especially for governments and organizations that must make their meetings public.

The recently closed Pickens County Medical Center in Carrollton, Ala., is one of the latest health care facilities to fall victim to a wave of rural hospital shutdowns across the U.S. in recent years. With hundreds of hospitals endangered, residents are worried about getting health care amid the coronavirus outbreak. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

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Jay Reeves/AP

Small-Town Hospitals Are Closing Just As Coronavirus Arrives In Rural America

Small-town hospitals were already closing at an alarming rate before COVID-19, but now the trend appears to be accelerating just as the disease arrives in rural America.

An ill woman enters Elmhurst Hospital Center in the Queens borough of New York City this week. Locked away from families, hospitalized patients these days feel particularly isolated emotionally as well as physically, psychiatrists say. Teletherapy can help bridge the gap and ease that pain. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Psychiatrists Lean Hard On Teletherapy To Reach Isolated Patients In Emotional Pain

Remote mental health treatment isn't the same as in-person visits with a psychiatrist, but faced with a pandemic, many people have been forced to make do. Regulators are making that access easier.

Life Kit shares tips on how to turn your food scraps into rich soil through composting. Julia Simon for NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon for NPR

How To Compost At Home

Whether you've got a small apartment or a big backyard, there are ways to compost your kitchen scraps in any space. This episode is your starter for how to compost your organic waste into rich soil. Also, how to get the right mix of greens and browns and what you can and can't compost.

How To Compost At Home

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Familiar enemies return in Half-Life: Alyx. Valve hide caption

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Valve

'Half-Life: Alyx' And The Promise of Virtual Reality

After thirteen years, a new Half-Life video game is finally here. Aside from being the latest entry into an anticipated franchise — it's also one of the biggest virtual reality games yet.

'Half-Life: Alyx' And The Promise of Virtual Reality

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Stan Ridgway of Wall of Voodoo performs in the band's video for "Mexican Radio." YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Combining Film Scores And Pop Rock, Wall Of Voodoo Was Not Just A One-Hit Wonder

As part of NPR's series "One-Hit Wonders/Second-Best Songs," music supervisor Alexandra Patsavas recommends "Ring of Fire" by Wall of Voodoo. The band is mostly known for its 1983 hit "Mexican Radio."

Combining Film Scores And Pop Rock, Wall Of Voodoo Was Not Just A One-Hit Wonder

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The White House's new chief spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany has a flair for confrontational and sometimes untrue assertions on cable news — much like her boss, the president. Scott W. Grau/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott W. Grau/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

'She'll Fit Right In': Combative TV Pundit's Meteoric Rise To Trump White House

The White House's new chief spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany has a flair for confrontational and sometimes untrue assertions on cable news — much like her boss, the president.

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