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Our Language Is Evolving, 'Because Internet'

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John Steinbeck's 'The Amiable Fleas' Published In English For The 1st Time

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'Cities Are Resilient,' Says Baltimore Crime Novelist Laura Lippman

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Henry Holt and Company

Looking Back At Human History, Archaeologist Suspects 'We're 51% Good'

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It may plague your summer peaches and plums, but the fruit fly is "one of the most important animals" in medical research, says conservationist Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson. Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images hide caption

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Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images

Bugged By Insects? 'Buzz, Sting, Bite' Makes The Case For 6-Legged Friends

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Former CIA Official Philip Mudd Discusses New Book On Post-9/11 Intelligence Community

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This costume, with corn husks and feathers and paper flowers, is worn by a member of a dance group that gathers in cemeteries and other places to mark Day of the Dead festivities (called Xantolo, the word written above the mask). The idea of combining a skeletal mask with European fashion was devised by the Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada, who lived in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Phyllis Galembo hide caption

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Phyllis Galembo

Book: 'A Terrible Thing To Waste'

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