Fresh Air Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
Fresh Air
NPR

Fresh Air

From NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

Most Recent Episodes

Bill Hader On 'Barry'

Hader, who became famous as a writer and performer on 'Saturday Night Live,' now stars in the HBO series 'Barry.' Hader plays a Marine who suffers from depression and PTSD ever since returning from Afghanistan. While working as a hit man in Los Angeles, he discovers that he wants to pursue acting instead. Hader speaks with Terry Gross about writing the series with Alec Berg, struggling with severe anxiety while on 'SNL,' and his love of old movies.

Bill Hader On 'Barry'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/734410139/734472070" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ava DuVernay On 'When They See Us'

DuVernay's Netflix series tells the story of how five black and brown boys, known as the Central Park Five, were manipulated into confessing to a brutal rape they did not commit. 'When They See Us' focuses on the boys' perspective — and the criminal justice system that failed them.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Toy Story 4.'

Ava DuVernay On 'When They See Us'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/734053116/734383228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Uncovering The Story Of Major Taylor, America's First Black Sports Hero

At the height of the Jim Crow era, Taylor broke barriers by becoming the country's fastest and most famous cyclist. Author and 'Washington Post' journalist Michael Kranish tells his story in the new book, 'The World's Fastest Man.' "He really belongs in the pantheon of civil rights leaders as a sports athlete," Kranish says. "He was able to use his athleticism and his championships for a greater purpose to show that the racist theories of eugenics and other things were wrong."

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan recommends two new noir suspense novels for summer — 'This Storm' by James Ellroy and 'Conviction' by Denise Mina. And Ken Tucker reviews Willie Nelson's new album 'Ride Me Back Home.'

Uncovering The Story Of Major Taylor, America's First Black Sports Hero

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733709146/733804629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Rethinking 'Elderhood'

Geriatrician Dr. Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. "I need to be a different sort of doctor for people at different ages and phases of old age," she says. Aronson writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, 'Elderhood.'

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a live recording from saxophonist Stan Getz.

Rethinking 'Elderhood'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733413024/733811526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Best Of: How Ordinary People Got Us To The Moon / Actor Damian Lewis

This summer marks 50 years since the first Apollo moon landing. Journalist Charles Fishman's new book 'One Giant Leap' focuses on the untold stories of the ordinary men and women who worked behind-the-scenes on the Apollo missions. "Apollo was the biggest non-military effort in the history of human civilization," Fishman says. He talks about the team at Playtex who designed the spacesuits, the computer programmers, and the state of the U.S. space program today.

Ken Tucker reviews Bruce Springsteen's new solo album, 'Western Stars.'

Classically-trained British actor Damian Lewis plays a ruthless hedge-fund manager on Showtime's 'Billions,' which recently ended its fourth season. He also starred in the series 'Homeland' as Nicholas Brody, a Marine sergeant who converts to Islam in captivity.

Best Of: How Ordinary People Got Us To The Moon / Actor Damian Lewis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/732730253/733811197" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

'I Wrote This Book Because I Love You'

Writer and cartoonist Tim Kreider admits unabashedly that the longest relationship of his adult life was with the stray cat that became his companion for 19 years. His collection of personal essays details his many unconventional relationships, which include the girlfriend he traveled with on a circus train, a married woman he fell in love with and his whirlwind romance with a sexual performance artist. "One of the few conclusions I may have reached from writing this book is that when we say 'relationship' or 'marriage' we all think we're talking about the same thing," Kreider says. "But I think there are a lot of different deals out there." (Originally broadcast Feb. 2018)

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Showtime cop drama 'City on a Hill.'

'I Wrote This Book Because I Love You'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/732730063/732836299" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

How Hackers Pose A Threat To Cities & Elections

'New York Times' cybersecurity correspondent Nicole Perlroth says hacking tools developed by the NSA were stolen, posted online and are now being used in cyberattacks, including one on the city of Baltimore.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Last Black Man in San Francisco.'

How Hackers Pose A Threat To Cities & Elections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/731646819/733809552" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

How Ordinary People Got Us To The Moon

This summer marks 50 years since the first Apollo moon landing. Journalist Charles Fishman's new book 'One Giant Leap' focuses on the untold stories of the ordinary men and women who worked behind-the-scenes on the Apollo missions. "Apollo was the biggest non-military effort in the history of human civilization," Fishman says. He talks about the team at Playtex who designed the spacesuits, the computer programmers, and how NASA nearly forgot to send an American flag into space.

How Ordinary People Got Us To The Moon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/731253962/732152810" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Inside Kim Jong Un's North Korea

'Washington Post' journalist Anna Fifield visited North Korea and interviewed many of its citizens — including members of Kim Jong Un's family — for her new book about the country and its leader. Her book is 'The Great Successor.'

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'The Body in Question' by Jill Ciment, about jurors on a murder trial.

Inside Kim Jong Un's North Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/731253935/731714252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Actor Damian Lewis

The classically-trained British actor plays a ruthless hedge-fund manager on Showtime's 'Billions,' which recently ended its fourth season. Lewis describes his character as "the embodiment of the American dream." He also starred in the series 'Homeland' as Nicholas Brody, a Marine sergeant who converts to Islam in captivity.

Also, Soraya Nadia McDonald reviews 'When They See Us,' Ava DuVernay's devastating new miniseries about the Central Park Five.

Actor Damian Lewis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/731253640/731333902" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Back To Top
or search npr.org