Embedded Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.
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Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.

Most Recent Episodes

How It Ends: The Search

In 2015, Bashir Shikder returned from an overseas trip to an empty house. His wife had taken his two young children to live in the Islamic State. For the past four years he's done everything he can to try to get them back. And now that ISIS has lost all his territory, he wants to know... Where are they?

How It Ends: The Search

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At Nineveh Criminal Court in Iraq, where counter-terrorism cases against ISIS suspects are tried, women show photos of their relatives. Families visit the court to get more information about relatives, who may be accused of ties to ISIS or are being held in detention. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alleruzzo/AP

How It Ends: Judgment

How It Ends: Judgment

How It Ends: Judgment

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How It Ends: The Brother

What would you do if your brother wound up far away, having made a terrible mistake? What would you do if it involved ISIS? How far would you go? On today's show, we find out.

How It Ends: The Brother

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Coming Next Week: How It Ends

Now that ISIS has lost its territory, what happens to all the people from around the world who ran off to join it? Their governments don't want them. But their families do. We follow them as they try to get their loved ones out.

Coming Next Week: How It Ends

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An ambulance arrives at San Francisco hospital in Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico amid widespread power failures after Hurricane Maria. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

After The Storm

For months, officials claimed fewer than 100 people died from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Then, all of a sudden, the official estimate rose to nearly 3,000 deaths. How did that happen? We have the story of one family that helps make sense of it.

After The Storm

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Florida is one of only four states that permanently ban people with felony convictions from voting, even after they've completed their sentences. On Election Day, Florida voters will get to decide whether to change that system. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Hearing

This is a story about who is allowed to vote... and who is not. In Florida, the ultimate swing state, 1.5 million people cannot vote, because they have a past felony on their record. And there is one way to try and get that right back: Ask the governor directly.

The Hearing

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Trump Stories: The Apprentice

Omarosa Manigault Newman has a new book. What about those tapes? We re-visit an episode from our "Trump Stories" season.

Trump Stories: The Apprentice

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Outside the Supreme Court, people protest the ruling upholding President Donald Trump's travel ban on June 26, 2018. Under President Trump's order, people from seven countries - most of them majority Muslim - cannot obtain visas to enter the U.S unless they obtain a waiver. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The Waiver

President Trump's travel ban has been upheld by the Supreme Court. People from the seven banned countries can still come to the U.S. if they get a special "waiver." So far, few people have gotten them. We follow one Yemeni family as they try to get a waiver to escape a civil war. Supreme Court audio in this episode comes from Oyez.

The Waiver

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President Obama meets with advisors in the Oval Office to discuss Syria, in this official White House photo. Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes, seen here speaking into the ear of Chief Of Staff Denis McDonough, has described the internal White House decision-making on Syria in a new memoir. Pete Souza/Official White House Photo hide caption

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Pete Souza/Official White House Photo

The Red Line

From 2011-2013, Kelly covered the war in Syria, where people would ask, "Why won't the U.S. intervene?" Then came a chemical attack, ordered by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, that killed more than 1,000 people, and the U.S. almost intervened, but didn't. Now, a new book tells why.

The Red Line

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Police Videos: North Miami

Police shoot the wrong guy. A collaboration with WNYC Studios and their podcast Aftereffect.

Police Videos: North Miami

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