Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.

Most Recent Episodes

Can the Go-Go Go On?

Ryan-Camille Guyot holds a sign outside of the Metro PCS in protest after the store was forced to turn off it's Go-Go music due to noise complaints. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can the Go-Go Go On?

For more than two decades, a cellphone store in Washington, D.C. has blasted go-go music right outside of its front door. But a recent noise complaint from a resident of a new, upscale apartment building in the area brought the music to a halt — highlighting the tensions over gentrification in the nation's capital.

Can the Go-Go Go On?

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Love & Walkouts

Left: Yoli Ríos. Right: Bobby Verdugo. Courtesy of Bobby Verdugo and Yoli Ríos hide caption

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Courtesy of Bobby Verdugo and Yoli Ríos

Love & Walkouts

In 1968, thousands of students participated in a series of protests for equity in education that sparked the Chicano Movement. But for two of the students at one struggling high school, that civil unrest — which became known as East L.A. Walkouts — also marked the beginning of a 50-year romance. This week, Code Switch is cosigning that love story, brought to us by our play-cousins at Latino USA.

Love & Walkouts

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Why Is It So Hard To Talk About Israel?
LA Johnson/NPR

Why Is It So Hard To Talk About Israel?

Support for Israel has long been the rare bipartisan position among lawmakers in Washington. But recently, several younger, brown members of Congress have vocally questioned the U.S.'s relationship with Israel — and were met with fierce condemnation, including charges that their criticism was anti-Semitic. On this episode: We're talking about why it remains so hard to have nuanced conversations about Israel.

Why Is It So Hard To Talk About Israel?

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Ask Code Switch: You Are What You Eat
LA Johnson

Ask Code Switch: You Are What You Eat

This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

Ask Code Switch: You Are What You Eat

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"On Strike! Blow It Up!"

Lisa Rae Gutierrez was one of the students at San Francisco State who took part in the longest student strike in the nation's history fifty years ago. Shereen Marisol Meraji hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji

"On Strike! Blow It Up!"

Fifty years ago a multi-racial coalition of students at a commuter college in San Francisco went on strike. And while their bloody, bitter standoff has been largely forgotten, it forever changed higher education in the United States.

"On Strike! Blow It Up!"

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Respect Yourself
LA Johnson/NPR

Respect Yourself

What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.

Respect Yourself

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When Disaster Strikes

A boy rides his bike through still water after a thunderstorm in the Lakewood area of East Houston, which flooded during Hurricane Harvey. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

When Disaster Strikes

A deadly tornado ripped through Lee County Alabama this past Sunday. An NPR investigation found that white Americans and those with safety nets often receive more federal dollars after a disaster than people of color and Americans with less wealth.

When Disaster Strikes

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On The Shoulders Of Giants

3 AUG 1960: Wilma Rudolph of the USA, on the awards stand after winning the gold medal in the 200 meter spring at the Summer Olympics in Rome. Hulton Deutsch/All Hulton Deutsch/Getty hide caption

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Hulton Deutsch/Getty

On The Shoulders Of Giants

When Colin Kaepernick stopped standing for the national anthem at NFL games it sparked a nationwide conversation about patriotism and police brutality. Black athletes using their platform to protest injustice has long been a tradition in American history. In this episode we tap in our friends at Throughline to explore three stories of protest that are rarely told but essential to understanding the current debate: the heavyweight boxer Jack Johnson, the sprinter Wilma Rudolph, and the basketball player Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf.

On The Shoulders Of Giants

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Getting A Foot In the Door

Leonissa Duarte, 18, left, and Freddy Tijerino, 18, star in director Anali Cabrera's film Luna at Moonlight, set at the Moonlight Rollerway in Glendale, CA. Courtesy of Anali Cabrera hide caption

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Courtesy of Anali Cabrera

Getting A Foot In the Door

Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?

Getting A Foot In the Door

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From Blackface To Blackfishing

A sheet music poster from 1937 of Amos 'n' Andy, a popular radio show. Ric Francis/Associated Press hide caption

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Ric Francis/Associated Press

From Blackface To Blackfishing

Okay, news cycle: you win. We're talking about blackface. This week, we delve into the hidden history of "blackening up" in popular culture — from a certain iconic cartoon mouse's minstrel past to Instagram models trying to pass as black.

From Blackface To Blackfishing

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