Animals Animals

Animals

Sam Hull comforts her sheep, Gwen, who suffered burns from the Tick Fire, in Santa Clarita, Calif., on Oct. 25. Shortly after, they traveled to Hull's father's house for the night. Allison Zaucha hide caption

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Allison Zaucha

Common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus), such as this group day-roosting in a cave in Mexico, can form cooperative, friendship-like social relationships. B.G. Thomson/Science Source hide caption

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B.G. Thomson/Science Source

For These Vampires, A Shared Blood Meal Lets 'Friendship' Take Flight

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A "murder" scene could seem creepy, but what is going on inside these crows' minds may be most unsettling. Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images

Elephants approach a road at Liwonde. Reid says the park hasn't lost a single high-value animal in 30 months. Thoko Chikondi for NPR hide caption

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Thoko Chikondi for NPR

49-Minute Listen

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A mix of barley, peas and flax grows in a field at Casey Bailey's farm near Fort Benton, Mont. Bailey sells this crop to Montana dairy farmer Nate Brown, who has been feeding it to his goats. Casey Bailey hide caption

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Casey Bailey

A rhesus macaque monkey grooms another on Cayo Santiago, off the eastern coast of Puerto Rico. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Firefighter Pinyo Pukpinyo holds a Burmese python. In 16 years of snake wrangling, he says he has been bitten more than 20 times but helping people desperate to get rid of snakes in their homes "makes me happy." Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Unlike most dairy cows in America, which are descended from just two bulls, this cow at Pennsylvania State University has a different ancestor: She is the daughter of a bull that lived decades ago, called University of Minnesota Cuthbert. The bull's frozen semen was preserved by the U.S. Agriculture Department. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls. That's Not Good

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Goldfish, like these showcased at Tokyo's Nihonbashi Art Aquarium, have been bred in China over centuries, into forms so varied and rare that one can be worth hundreds of dollars. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

The Goldfish Tariff: Fancy Pet Fish Among The Stranger Casualties Of The Trade War

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The crumpled carcass of a bull lies on U.S. Forest Service ground. It was among several killed and mutilated this summer in eastern Oregon. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

'Not One Drop Of Blood': Cattle Mysteriously Mutilated In Oregon

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Swinomish tribal member Vernon Cayou gathers clams at Ala Spit County Park in Puget Sound. Megan Farmer /KUOW hide caption

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Megan Farmer /KUOW

Pacific Northwest Tribes Face Climate Change With Agricultural Ancient Practice

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Bear No. 68 has packed on the pounds needed for a long hibernation. Courtesy of NPS Photos hide caption

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Courtesy of NPS Photos

It's Fat Bear Week In Alaska's Katmai National Park — Time To Fill Out Your Bracket

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A 1,600-pound bull ventured on a short-lived quest for freedom Wednesday in West Baltimore, spending about three hours on the loose before finally succumbing to tranquilizers and being put back into the trailer whence he came. WUSA9/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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WUSA9/Screenshot by NPR

In the Netherlands, farmers block a major highway with their tractors on Tuesday during a national protest. Farmers say their livestock and operations are being unfairly blamed for greenhouse gas emissions. Vincent Jannink/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Jannink/AFP/Getty Images

Botswana has the world's largest elephant population, with some 130,000 animals. Greg Du Toit/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Du Toit/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

It's estimated that more than half of the indoor cats in the U.S. are overweight. (Above) Miko the cat, aka "Miko Angelo," is seen before and after participation in a study about feline weight loss. Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine hide caption

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Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine

For Fat Cats, The Struggle Is Real When It Comes To Losing Weight And Keeping It Off

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