Animals Animals

Animals

Elk graze in Skagit Valley, an area north of Seattle, Wash., populated for centuries by Native Americans and, more recently, by farmers. Megan Farmer/KUOW hide caption

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Megan Farmer/KUOW

Elk Raise Tensions Between Tribes And Farmers In Washington's Skagit Valley

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A team of Stanford University researchers designed the PigeonBot. Lentink Lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Lentink Lab/Stanford University

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight

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Scientists put several litters of wolf puppies through a standard battery of tests. Many pups, such as this one named Flea, wouldn't fetch a ball. But then something surprising happened. Christina Hansen Wheat hide caption

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Christina Hansen Wheat

Fetching With Wolves: What It Means That A Wolf Puppy Will Retrieve A Ball

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Recent research has explored "helping" behavior in species ranging from nonhuman primates to rats and bats. To see whether intelligent birds might help out a feathered pal, scientists did an experiment using African grey parrots like these. Henry Lok/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Henry Lok/EyeEm/Getty Images

Polly Share A Cracker? Parrots Can Practice Acts Of Kindness, Study Finds

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Cattle stand in a field under a red sky caused by bushfires in Greendale on the outskirts of Bega, in Australia's New South Wales state on January 5, 2020. Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images

A herd of goats spent the fall in and around Deer Canyon Park in Anaheim, Calif., helping to keep grasses and other potential wildfire fuels in check. Megan Manata hide caption

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Megan Manata

California Cities Turn To Hired Hooves To Help Prevent Massive Wildfires

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A Newell's shearwater nests in mountain burrows on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. André Raine/Kauai Endangered Seabird Recovery Project hide caption

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André Raine/Kauai Endangered Seabird Recovery Project

Threatened Hawaiian Bird Strives To Make Comeback

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Lionfish are native to the South Pacific and Indian Oceans, but they've taken hold in the Atlantic and Caribbean, without many natural predators to keep them in check. Benjamin Lowy/Getty Images hide caption

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Benjamin Lowy/Getty Images

Invasive Species: We Asked, You Answered

We couldn't stop at the spotted lanternfly! (We covered that invasive species in an earlier episode.) We wanted to hear about the invasives where you live. You wrote us about cane toads in Australia, zebra mussels in Nevada; borers, beetles, adelgids, stinkbugs, and so many more. From your emails, we picked three invaders to talk about with NPR science correspondent Dan Charles. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

Invasive Species: We Asked, You Answered

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Sadie, a black, Australian labradoodle, is 7 years old. The idea that she's 49 in human years isn't right. Researchers now say she's closer to 62. Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

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Peter Breslow/NPR

A New Way To Calculate Your Dog's Age

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A murder of crows sit in a tree in Rochester, Minn. Each year, the birds arrive in mid-November and stay for the winter. Evan Frost /MPR News hide caption

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Evan Frost /MPR News

This Minnesota City Has A Bird Poop Problem, But The Crow Patrol Is On It

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The Tennessee Aquarium says a system connected to an electric eel's tank enables his shocks to power strands of lights on the nearby tree. Thom Benson/AP hide caption

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Thom Benson/AP

Noeel: Electric Eel Lights Up Christmas Tree In Tennessee

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Angela Haseltine Pozzi founded Washed Ashore in 2010. The nonprofit turns plastics taken from Oregon's beaches into eye-opening sculptures of threatened marine life. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

On The Oregon Coast, Turning Pollution Into Art With A Purpose

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Eye contact may trigger release of the brain hormone oxytocin in both humans and dogs. Photos by R A Kearton/Getty Images hide caption

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Photos by R A Kearton/Getty Images

Two male turkeys from North Carolina named Bread and Butter hang out in their hotel room at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, D.C., ahead of Tuesday's pardoning. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Trump Pardons Pair Of Turkeys — The Strange Truth Behind The Tradition

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