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Animals

Shariah Harris competed in the Amateur Cup tournament in Tully, N.Y., this past August. Courtesy of Lezlie Hiner hide caption

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Courtesy of Lezlie Hiner

Philly Teens 'Work To Ride' And Change The Face Of Polo

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Seeing dogs all day has its perks, veterinary neurologist Carrie Jurney says. But it also has downsides, including stress, debt, long hours and facing online harassment. Janet Delaney for NPR hide caption

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Janet Delaney for NPR

Veterinarians Are Killing Themselves. An Online Group Is There To Listen And Help

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The sounds of pleasant, relaxed bird chatter made eastern grey squirrels resume foraging more quickly after hearing the sounds of a predator, researchers found. Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images

The Other Twitterverse: Squirrels Eavesdrop On Birds, Researchers Say

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Dr. Amir Khalil, a veterinarian with the animal rescue charity Four Paws International, carries a sedated coyote at a zoo in Rafah in the Gaza Strip, during the evacuation of animals in April. Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images

As part of a national plan reassessing the status of animals and plants on the endangered species list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has recommended that Key deer be "delisted due to recovery." Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Trump Administration Opens Door To Dropping Florida's Key Deer From Endangered List

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Raedeyn Teton, left, and Jessica Broncho, race side-by-side in an Indian Relay on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in Idaho. Russel Daniels/KUER hide caption

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Russel Daniels/KUER

Indian Relay Celebrates History And Culture Through Horse Racing

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Locusts swarm over Yemen's capital. Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images

Maybe The Way To Control Locusts Is By Growing Crops They Don't Like

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Marium, a lost baby dugong, gets a hug from an official of Thailand's Department of Marine and Coastal Resources. The 8-month-old mammal, who captured hearts online, died after biologists believe she ate plastic waste. Sirachai Arunrugstichai/AP hide caption

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Sirachai Arunrugstichai/AP

Denise Herzing on the TED stage. James Duncan Davidson / TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson / TED

Denise Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?

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Barbara King Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED hide caption

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Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Barbara King: Do Animals Grieve?

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The kitten Hank was infected with fleas and a deadly feline virus before Hannah Shaw took her in. Hank became the cover model for Shaw's new book on neonatal kitten care, Tiny but Mighty. Andrew Marttila and Hannah Shaw/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Andrew Marttila and Hannah Shaw/Penguin Random House

How Hannah Shaw, The 'Kitten Lady,' Rescues The Most Fragile Felines

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Spanish matador Alberto Lopez Simon makes a pass on a bull at the Plaza de Toros de Las Ventas bullring in Madrid. The restaurant Casa Toribio, located just down the street, keeps the meat from from bulls killed in bullfighting on its menu all year long. Alberto Simon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Simon/AFP/Getty Images

It may plague your summer peaches and plums, but the fruit fly is "one of the most important animals" in medical research, says conservationist Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson. Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images hide caption

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Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images

Bugged By Insects? 'Buzz, Sting, Bite' Makes The Case For 6-Legged Friends

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A common guillemot (Uria aalge) brings a sprat to feed to its chick. The laying dates of this species were followed for 19 consecutive years on the Isle of May, off the coast of southeast Scotland. According to a new paper in Nature Communications, many birds are adapting to climate change — but probably not fast enough. Michael P. Harris hide caption

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Michael P. Harris