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Facebook says it will launch a new cryptocurrency called Libra and a digital wallet called Calibra in 2020. Dado Ruvic/Reuters hide caption

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Dado Ruvic/Reuters

Facebook Unveils Libra Cryptocurrency, Sets Launch For 2020

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Workers produce vehicles at Volkswagen's U.S. plant in Chattanooga, Tenn. Some 1,600 workers have narrowly voted against unionizing the plant, the second time an effort to unionize the plant has failed in recent years. Erik Schelzig/AP hide caption

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Erik Schelzig/AP

Walmart is among the more than 600 companies and trade associations that signed a letter warning the president of the broader impacts of his proposed tariffs. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Two white steel pulleys are part of a $16 million ride going up in eastern China's newest military-themed amusement park, Sun Tzu Cultural Park. They'll be shipped to the Qingdao port southeast of Beijing, where customers will have to pay a newly imposed tariff. Since last fall, Beijing has hiked the duty on U.S.-made amusement rides twice. Rebecca Ellis/KUER hide caption

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Rebecca Ellis/KUER

A Not-So-Thrilling Ride For U.S.-Made Roller Coasters

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President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping are expected to talk about trade on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, later this month. Thomas Peter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Turns Trade Talks Into Spectator Sport

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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An F-150 pickup is assembled at a Ford plant in Dearborn, Mich., last year. Manufacturing has been a soft spot in recent months. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Hiring Slows Amid Trade Tensions, With Only 75,000 Jobs Added In May

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Cargo trucks pass the secondary fence that divides the United States and Mexico in Otay Mesa, Calif., on May 31. Vice President Pence held a meeting with Mexican officials on Wednesday over threats to raise tariffs on that country. Ariana Drehsler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An employee works at a wiring harness and cable assembly manufacturing company in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, that exports to the U.S. in 2017. The auto industry says threatened tariffs would play havoc with supply chains. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Ohio To Juárez And Back Again: Why Tariffs On Mexico Alarm The Auto Industry

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Tourists who have just disembarked from a cruise liner tour Havana on Tuesday. The Trump administration has imposed major new travel restrictions on visits to Cuba by U.S. citizens. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Trucks are seen heading into the United States from Mexico along the Bridge of the Americas in El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday. U.S. industries say President Trump's threatened tariffs on goods from Mexico raised uncertainty just as they were looking forward to a new trade agreement. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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White House's About-Face On Mexican Trade A 'Gut Punch' To U.S. Businesses

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