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Frank Ruopoli of Charleston, S.C., works at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After the 2013 partial shutdown he earned an emergency medical technician certification. Now he's found a part-time job to earn money during this shutdown. Courtesy of Frank Ruopoli hide caption

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Courtesy of Frank Ruopoli

Federal Employees Moonlight To Pay The Bills

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The US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 14, 2019, is seen following a snowstorm. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

'Barely Treading Water': Why The Shutdown Disproportionately Affects Black Americans

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Federal Reserve Board Gov. Lael Brainard says a growing body of research suggests that diversity leads to better decision-making. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

The Push To Break Up The Boys' Club At The Fed

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IRS employee Pam Crosbie and others hold signs protesting the government shutdown at a federal building in Ogden, Utah. Natalie Behring/Getty Images hide caption

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A "for sale" sign is seen in front of a home in Miami on Jan. 24, 2018. The partial shutdown of the federal government is causing some financial problems for furloughed workers who can't refinance their mortgages or buy homes because lenders can't verify their income. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Mortgage Deals Are In Limbo As Government Shutdown Drags On

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People at the Ford display at the Essen Motor Show fair in Essen, Germany, in December 2017. The automaker has announced it will be cutting some jobs in Europe to reduce costs. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Jacinda, whose husband is a TSA officer in Portland, Ore., working during the shutdown without pay, with her two young children. Her family is worried about how they will pay their rent, electric bill and cellphone bill. Courtesy of Jacinda hide caption

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Courtesy of Jacinda

'I'm Scared': TSA Families Fear Falling Behind On Bills, Losing Their Homes

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Cheese is packaged for sale at Widmer's Cheese Cellars in 2016 in Theresa, Wis. Record dairy production in the U.S. has produced a record surplus of cheese causing prices to drop. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump speaks during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 26, 2018. He became the first U.S. leader to visit the annual gathering in 18 years. Denis Balibouse/Reuters hide caption

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Denis Balibouse/Reuters

A section of the reinforced U.S.-Mexico border fence in the Otay Mesa area, San Diego County, is seen from Tijuana in Mexico. President Trump says a border wall made of steel would help American steel companies. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Sees Border Wall As Another Boost For U.S. Steel Industry

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Sally Deng for NPR

Why This Charity Isn't Afraid To Say It Failed

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Chinese shoppers spend their time next to a bench painted with the U.S. flag at the capital city's popular shopping mall in Beijing. During trade talks this week, the two sides face potentially lengthy wrangling over technology and the future of their economic relationship. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP