Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Trump Reverses Education Secretary DeVos' Plans To Cut Funding For Special Olympics

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Howard Stevenson on the TED stage. JEROD HARRIS /TED hide caption

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JEROD HARRIS /TED

Howard Stevenson: How Can We Mindfully Navigate Everyday Racism?

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Monique Morris on the TED stage. Marla Aufmuth/TED hide caption

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Marla Aufmuth/TED

Monique Morris: Why Are Black Girls More Likely To Be Punished In School?

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Travis Jones on the TED stage. TEDx Charlotte hide caption

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TEDx Charlotte

Travis Jones: How Can White People Be Better Allies To People Of Color?

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The Westminster Choir, performing with the New York Philharmonic and conductor Colin Davis in New York City in 2003. Hiroyuki Ito/Getty Images hide caption

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Hiroyuki Ito/Getty Images
Ran Zheng for NPR

Sparkle Unicorns And Fart Ninjas: What Parents Can Do About Gendered Toys

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Duke University is paying the U.S. $112.5 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by submitting falsified research data to win or keep federal grants. Here, a photo shows the Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C., in 2008, when some of the fraud was alleged to have taken place. Chris Keane/Reuters hide caption

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Chris Keane/Reuters

John Awiel Chol Diing, who grew up in refugee camps, is now studying agricultural science at Earth University in Costa Rica. Above: He visited Washington, D.C., last week as a 2019 Next Generation Delegate, a program run by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. "To be dedicating his life to giving back — his was a voice we had to have," says Marcus Glassman of the council. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

President Donald Trump speaks during an executive order signing on Thursday. Trump signed an executive order requiring colleges to certify that they accept free and open inquiry in order to get federal grants. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Students attend a Ukrainian language and literature lesson at a school in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk in 2016. In 2018, students in four cities across Ukraine received training to help them identify disinformation, propaganda and hate speech. Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images