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Energy

Just outside of Paradise, the charred remains of the Camp Fire stops just short of a home that survived the blaze. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

'Rethinking The Past' In The Aftermath Of California's Deadly Wildfires

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Carbon Engineering CEO Steve Oldham stands in front of the company's Squamish, British Columbia, pilot plant. It uses a chemical process to extract carbon dioxide from the air and turn it into a fuel similar to crude oil. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

How One Company Pulls Carbon From The Air, Aiming To Avert A Climate Catastrophe

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OPEC President Suhail al-Mazrouei speaks Friday at OPEC headquarters in Vienna. OPEC, Russia and other producers have agreed to cut production, ignoring pressure from President Trump. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

The greater sage grouse is viewed as an "indicator" species for the health of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Tom Koerner/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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Tom Koerner/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Dungeness crab like these, caught off the coast of Alaska, have been affected by the neurotoxin domoic acid because of algae blooms in recent years, which makes them unsafe to eat. Michael Melford/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Melford/Getty Images

Leoyla Cowboy was among the many indigenous people from around the world who came to North Dakota to participate in the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

2 Years After Standing Rock Protests, Tensions Remain But Oil Business Booms

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A "Yellow Vest" protester waves a French flag in Villefranche-sur-Saone on Saturday, during a demonstration against high fuel prices. Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images

Workers at a Wold Energy Partners well pad in Wyoming place gravel where oil tanks will soon stand. A spike in drilling in the state is getting a boost from new lease sales on public land. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Media

Trump Push For 'Energy Dominance' Boosts Drilling On Public Land

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The London skyline, shown in March 2017, is still shining bright. But the U.K. is using noticeably less energy than it did more than a decade ago. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

The U.K. Economy Is Growing — But Its Energy Use Is Shrinking

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An oil well just south of Watford City, North Dakota, is one of thousands drilled in recent years. The oil-rich Bakken shale formation has made North Dakota the second-largest crude-producing state behind only Texas. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

After Struggles, North Dakota Grows Into Its Ongoing Oil Boom

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In the Beaufort Sea off the coast of Alaska, global warming is melting sea ice and glaciers at an historic rate. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Hydrochar derived from poultry waste was produced in a lab at Ben-Gurion University in Israel. The hydrochar can be made into briquettes, which can be used as charcoal for cooking food. Juliana Neumann hide caption

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Juliana Neumann

Keystone XL pipeline sections sit on a train near Glendive, Mont. Nate Hegyi/Yellowstone Public Radio hide caption

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Nate Hegyi/Yellowstone Public Radio

As Construction Of Keystone XL Is Paused, Tribes Brace For What's Next

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Rancher Dave Creveling believes the cost of a new Washington state carbon fee would be passed along to rural people like him if voters approve it. Ashley Ahearn for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Ahearn for NPR

Washington State Could Become The First To Charge A Carbon Fee

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In New Mexico, an elected Land Commissioner oversees oil and gas leases on millions of acres of state land. The race is drawing big money from fossil fuel interests and environmental groups. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Why Big Money Is Being Pumped Into A Small New Mexico Race

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