Energy Energy

Energy

The shuttered San Onofre power plant is one of California's two nuclear power plants located near active earthquake faults. Spent nuclear fuel is being stored there currently. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

The ferries Malaspina and LeConte are docked near Juneau at sunrise. Both ships are part of Alaska's state ferry system, which could face steep budget cuts Oct. 1, under a proposal by Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy. Nat Herz/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Nat Herz/Alaska Public Media

In Alaska, Shrinking Oil Revenues May Mean Severe Cutbacks To State Ferry System

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West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice delivers his State of the State speech on Jan. 9 in Charleston, W.Va. Mining companies belonging to the Justice family owe millions in safety violations. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert/AP

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement are using Ian MacDonald's data to estimate the amount of oil being spilled at the Taylor Energy site. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Tegan Wendland/WWNO

This Oil Spill Has Been Leaking Into The Gulf For 14 Years

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After decades of dependency on coal for jobs, the Navajo Nation is turning to renewables. Two utility-scale solar farms have been built in recent years and another one is in the works. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

MIAMI, FL — TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2019-- Interested buyers view the live model of Monad Terrace Luxury Development, a luxury high rise in an area of heavy infrastructural investment to protect their building from sea level rise and hurricanes Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR hide caption

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Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR

Building For An Uncertain Future: Miami Residents Adapt To The Changing Climate

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David Bernhardt, a former oil and gas lobbyist, speaks before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee at his confirmation hearing to head the Interior Department, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 28, 2019. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A historical marker commemorates the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island — the most serious in U.S. history. To the left are the cooling towers for the mothballed Unit 2 reactor, which partially melted down. Joanne Cassaro/WITF hide caption

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Joanne Cassaro/WITF

40 Years After A Partial Nuclear Meltdown, A New Push To Keep Three Mile Island Open

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Prior to 1924, the average lifespan of a light bulb was around 2,500 hours. But in December 1924, a global organization known as the Phoebus Cartel hatched a secret plan to increase sales by bringing the average bulb's lifespan down to just 1,000 hours. This began one of the first known examples of planned obsolescence. Al Barry/Three Lions/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Barry/Three Lions/Getty Images

Power lines and power-generating windmills rise above the rural landscape on June 13, 2018, near Dwight, Ill. Driven by falling costs, global spending on renewable energy sources like wind and solar is now outpacing investment in electricity from fossil fuels and nuclear power. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Idaho Power says it already gets nearly half its energy from hydroelectric dams such as the Swan Falls Dam on the Snake River, just south of Boise. The utility plans to phase out its use of coal power plants. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

LED lightbulbs have replaced many incandescent ones. Now, the Trump administration wants to reverse an Obama-era rule designed to make a wide array of other lightbulbs more efficient. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Trump Administration Dims Rule On Energy Efficient Lightbulbs

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Daniel and Helen Pemberton support the huge solar farm planned in Spotsylvania County. They already have 40 solar panels in their own yard. Jacob Fenston/WAMU hide caption

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Jacob Fenston/WAMU

A Battle Is Raging Over The Largest Solar Farm East Of The Rockies

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At Toyota's LFA Works plant in Japan, the automaker manufactures 10 Mirai hydrogen fuel cell cars a day. It has plans to ramp up production. Hiroo Saso hide caption

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Hiroo Saso

Japan Is Betting Big On The Future Of Hydrogen Cars

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Hundreds of schoolchildren take part in a climate protest in Hong Kong Friday. So-called 'school strikes' were planned in more than 100 countries and territories, including the U.S., to protest governments' failure to act against global warming. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Skipping School Around The World To Push For Action On Climate Change

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Pumpjacks like this one dot the desert of southeast New Mexico, as oil and gas companies rush to develop one of the largest oil reserves in the world. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals

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