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Energy

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Give Up Your Gas Stove To Save The Planet? Banning Gas Is The Next Climate Push

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A Pipistrel Taurus Electro electric two-seat airplane flies above Ajdovscina, Slovenia. Jure Makovec/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jure Makovec/AFP/Getty Images

With An Eye Toward Lower Emissions, Clean Air Travel Gets Off The Ground

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Jason Carney designed and installed the solar array on the roof of his house in Nashville, Tenn. He wants to introduce more people in minority communities to the advantages of solar energy. Tamara Reynolds for NPR hide caption

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Tamara Reynolds for NPR

Stepping Into The Sun: A Mission To Bring Solar Energy To Communities Of Color

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Flames and smoke emerge from the Philadelphia Energy Solutions refinery in Philadelphia on June 21. Experts say the explosions could have been far more devastating if deadly hydrogen fluoride had been released. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

The Danish company Maersk has been shipping goods around the world since the age of steamships. Now it wants to usher in a new era, with carbon neutral transport. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

Giant Shipper Bets Big On Ending Its Carbon Emissions. Will It Pay Off?

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Tyler Holland guides his bike through the water as winds from Tropical Storm Barry push water from Lake Pontchartrain over the seawall Saturday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

French Transport Minister Elisabeth Borne says a new tax on airfares "is a response to the ecological urgency and sense of injustice expressed by the French." She's seen here with Minister for the Ecological and Inclusive Transition Francois de Rugy. Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters

A new law in Puerto Rico sets an ambitious timetable for the shift to renewable energy, including solar power. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico Harnesses The Power Of The Sun For A Renewable Energy Future

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David Smith Jr. is the second tribal chief of Arctic Village, and continues to fight drilling in the national refuge despite Congress's legalization of it. "I believe everything is going to come out on top for us," he says. Elizabeth Harball/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Elizabeth Harball/Alaska's Energy Desk

As Oil Drilling Nears In Arctic Refuge, 2 Alaska Villages See Different Futures

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In Utuado, Puerto Rico, construction work is still going on to replace a bridge destroyed in Hurricane Maria. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

'I Don't Feel Safe': Puerto Rico Preps For Next Storm Without Enough Government Help

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A Jaguar I-Pace, the first electric vehicle from the premium carmaker, charges during an event in Barcelona, Spain, in May. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tesla Led The Charge, But More Premium Electric Vehicles Are Arriving

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Emissions rise from the Duke Energy coal-fired Asheville Power Plant ahead of Hurricane Florence in Arden, N.C., in September 2018. Regulators are supposed to make sure Duke Energy delivers reliable power at the lowest possible cost — and that's always been interpreted as cost to the consumer, not cost to the environment. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images

North Carolina Tries To Clean Up Its Electricity

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An aerial view of the 52-megawatt solar farm built by Silicon Ranch in Hazlehurst, Ga. Ever cheaper and better solar technology, available land and lots of sunshine are driving demand for massive, utility-scale solar projects across the American Southeast. Silicon Ranch hide caption

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Silicon Ranch

How Georgia Became A Surprising Bright Spot In The U.S. Solar Industry

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The Environmental Protection Agency's final version of its Affordable Clean Energy rule is supported by the coal industry, but it's not clear that it will be enough to stop more coal-fired power plants from closing. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Trump Administration Weakens Climate Plan To Help Coal Plants Stay Open

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A tugboat operator secures a floating razor wire security fence during an emergency response exercise at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, last September. A new expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline would significantly expand tanker traffic in the region. Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In California's Mojave Desert sits First Solar Inc.'s Desert Sunlight Solar Farm. California is among the states leading the decarbonization charge. Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?

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