Energy Energy

Energy

Denise Brinley is executive director at the Pennsylvania Governor's Office of Energy. The state produces "playbooks" to highlight ways old coal power plant sites could be redeveloped. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Finding New Opportunity For Old Coal-Fired Power Plant Sites

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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt was among the most controversial of President Trump's original Cabinet-level picks. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Getty Images

Researchers also found that congestion on the roads in San Francisco also was exacerbated because of where the ride-hailing cars were and at what time of day. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Entering the control room at Three Mile Island Unit 1 is like stepping back in time. Except for a few digital screens and new counters, much of the equipment is original to 1974, when the plant began generating electricity. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Artist rendering of NuScale Power's nuclear power plant design, which would use small modular reactors. NuScale Power hide caption

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NuScale Power

This Company Says The Future Of Nuclear Energy Is Smaller, Cheaper And Safer

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The area of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen here in July 2010, shortly before the Macondo well was capped after spilling oil for 87 days. The Trump administration has proposed revisions to Obama-era rules that aimed to prevent similar disasters. Dave Martin/Associated Press hide caption

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Dave Martin/Associated Press

Emissions rise from three large smokestacks at a coal-fired power plant in Castle Dale, Utah, in 2017. Democratic presidential candidates are releasing plans to reduce U.S. emissions in order to head off the most dangerous consequences of global warming. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Nuclear Regulators Search For Temporary Storage Facility In New Mexico

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Once it is safe to remove the spent fuel from the pool, it's stored outside in metal casks. They are lined up on a concrete base, behind razor wire and against a hillside near the power plant. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

As Nuclear Waste Piles Up, Private Companies Pitch New Ways To Store It

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A Chinese-backed power plant under construction in 2018 in the desert in the Tharparkar district of Pakistan's southern Sindh province. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why Is China Placing A Global Bet On Coal?

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The offshore oil drilling platform 'Gail,' operated by Venoco, Inc., is shown off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif. in 2009. A Trump administration plan to greatly expand offshore drilling is on hold after a setback in court. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Pedestrians walk in Brooklyn on an unseasonably warm afternoon in February 2017, when temperatures reached near 60 degrees. To take action against climate change, New York City is requiring large buildings to retrofit their structures to improve energy efficiency. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

To Fight Climate Change, New York City Will Push Skyscrapers To Slash Emissions

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