Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Drinking fountains are marked "Do Not Drink Until Further Notice" at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Mich., in May 2016. After 18 months of insisting that water drawn from the Flint River was safe to drink, officials admitted it was not. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Golf-ball-sized hail carpets a street in Canberra on Monday, in a new twist on Australia's summer of extreme weather. The Australian Capital Territory's emergency service said it received a record number of calls for help — more than 1,900. Ying Tan/via Reuters hide caption

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Ying Tan/via Reuters
LA Johnson/NPR

'You Need To Act Now': Meet 4 Girls Working To Save The Warming World

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Elk graze in Skagit Valley, an area north of Seattle, Wash., populated for centuries by Native Americans and, more recently, by farmers. Megan Farmer/KUOW hide caption

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Megan Farmer/KUOW

Elk Raise Tensions Between Tribes And Farmers In Washington's Skagit Valley

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Levi Draheim, 11, wears a dust mask as he participates in a demonstration in Miami in July 2019. A lawsuit filed by him and other young people urging action against climate change was thrown out by a federal appeals court Friday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court

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Parroquia Inmaculada Concepción church in Guayanilla was heavily damaged after a 6.4 earthquake hit Southern Puerto Rico on January 7. Eric Rojas/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Rojas/Getty Images

2020 So Far: Fires, Floods, And Quakes

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Fire swept through Australia's Wollemi National Park, but firefighters were able to save rare groves of prehistoric Wollemi pines. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service via Reuters hide caption

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New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service via Reuters

For decades, the Earth has steadily gotten hotter. The planet has already warmed about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (or almost 1 degree Celsius) compared with in the mid-20th century. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

2019 Was The 2nd-Hottest Year On Record, According To NASA And NOAA

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BlackRock Chairman and CEO Larry Fink, seen here in Paris in July, wrote in his annual letter to CEOs that climate change will soon cause "a significant reallocation of capital." Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images

Vacant rowhouses line a portion of Franklin Square, a formerly redlined neighborhood in Baltimore. New research shows many communities subjected to discriminatory housing practices in the 1930s are hotter today. Ian Morton for NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton for NPR

Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today

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The Navajo Generating Station shut down in November 2019. The West's largest coal-fired power plant provided $12 million in yearly royalties to the Hopi Tribe. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Hopi Look To Tourism, Ranching For Income After Coal Power Plant Closure

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Residents who were living at the foot of Taal Volcano unload their belongings from an outrigger canoe while the volcano spews ash as seen from Tanauan town in Batangas Province, south of Manila, on Monday. Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is seen here last week visiting Kangaroo Island, which was devastated by wildfires. David Mariuz/Getty Images hide caption

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David Mariuz/Getty Images

Much of New South Wales, Australia, including the Sydney Opera House, lay under a shroud of smoke Thursday. The state remains under severe or very high fire danger warnings as more than 60 fires continue to burn within its borders. Cassie Trotter/Getty Images hide caption

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Cassie Trotter/Getty Images

This photo provided by the Bossier Parish Sheriff's Office shows damage from Friday night's severe weather, including the demolished home of an elderly couple who died in Bossier Parish, La. Bill Davis/AP hide caption

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Bill Davis/AP

Firefighters conduct property protection patrols at the Dunn Road Fire on Friday in Mount Adrah, Australia. New South Wales is battling severe fire conditions, with high temperatures and strong winds forecast across the state. Sam Mooy/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Mooy/Getty Images

With Their Land In Flames, Aboriginals Warn Fires Show Deep Problems In Australia

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The Blue Lake Rancheria microgrid powers a number of buildings on the reservation and helped provide necessary energy during county-wide power outages. Courtesy of the Blue Lake Rancheria hide caption

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Courtesy of the Blue Lake Rancheria

California Reservation's Solar Microgrid Provides Power During Utility Shutoffs

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The Trump administration wants to overhaul a major environmental law — the National Environmental Policy Act — to help speed approval of infrastructure projects, including oil and gas pipelines. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Trump Administration Proposes Major Changes To Bedrock Environmental Law

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Cattle stand in a field under a red sky caused by bushfires in Greendale on the outskirts of Bega, in Australia's New South Wales state on January 5, 2020. Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images