Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

For certain species, a market preference for plate-sized whole fillets is driving fishermen to target smaller fish, like these juvenile Malabar snappers. That means some wild fish aren't getting the chance to reproduce before they're caught. Andre Brugger hide caption

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Andre Brugger

At Toyota's LFA Works plant in Japan, the automaker manufactures 10 Mirai hydrogen fuel cell cars a day. It has plans to ramp up production. Hiroo Saso hide caption

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Hiroo Saso

Japan Is Betting Big On The Future Of Hydrogen Cars

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Darrell Blatchley, environmentalist and director of D' Bone Collector Museum, shows plastic waste found in the stomach of a Cuvier's beaked whale near the Philippine city of Davao. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of schoolchildren take part in a climate protest in Hong Kong Friday. So-called 'school strikes' were planned in more than 100 countries and territories, including the U.S., to protest governments' failure to act against global warming. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Skipping School Around The World To Push For Action On Climate Change

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The U.S. used to ship about 7 million tons of plastic trash to China a year, where much of it was recycled into raw materials. Then came the Chinese crackdown of 2018. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

Where Will Your Plastic Trash Go Now That China Doesn't Want It?

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Pumpjacks like this one dot the desert of southeast New Mexico, as oil and gas companies rush to develop one of the largest oil reserves in the world. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals

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A satellite image from Wednesday morning shows a powerful storm system heading east across the U.S. The storm is expected to bring high winds, snow and rain to much of the central U.S. in the coming days. GOES-East/NOAA hide caption

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GOES-East/NOAA

An estimated 5,500 Komodo dragons live in Komodo National Park. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Amid Tourism Push, Concern Grows Over Indonesia's Komodo Dragons

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Solar panels fill a field in Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France. Panoramic Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Panoramic Images/Getty Images

It's 2050 And This Is How We Stopped Climate Change

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Diversion facilities like this one help protect endangered fish in California. Environmentalists say such protections would be weakened under a Trump administration plan to send more water to the state's farmers. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Trump Administration Shortcuts Science To Give California Farmers More Water

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Last year, the author set about reducing her reliance on single-use disposables in the kitchen. Above are some of the tools she has adopted for food storage: a heavy-duty reusable silicone zip-top bag, bamboo towels, silicone disks that slip over the ends of cut pieces of fruits and vegetables, and beeswax-covered fabrics. Kristen Hartke for NPR/ hide caption

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Kristen Hartke for NPR/

Cal Poly architecture students focused on reimagining and rebuilding Paradise, Calif., by presenting models, renderings and updated concepts during a community forum in Chico, Calif. Jason Halley, CSU, Chico hide caption

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Jason Halley, CSU, Chico

'Reimagining Paradise' — Making Plans To Rebuild A Town Destroyed By Wildfire

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose lifting protections on the gray wolf, seen here in 2008. The species' status under the Endangered Species Act has been contested for years. Gary Kramer/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/AP hide caption

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Gary Kramer/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/AP

Australian officials say an environmental disaster is unfolding in the Solomon Islands after a ship ran aground and began leaking oil next to a UNESCO World Heritage site. The Australian High Commission Solomon Islands/AP hide caption

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The Australian High Commission Solomon Islands/AP

Grand Canyon National Park Superintendent Christine Lehnertz, seen in 2017 with then-Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, was recently cleared of allegations of workplace harassment. Felicia Fonseca/AP hide caption

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Felicia Fonseca/AP

'Unfounded' Bullying Accusations Sidelined Head Of Grand Canyon For 5 Months

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