Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Fish broker Khout Phany, 39, (under umbrella) sits while fishermen bring their catch to be weighed in Chhnok Tru, a fishing village at the southern tip of the Tonle Sap lake where it meets the river. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

A firefighter monitors a fire on Saturday near Port Macquarie in New South Wales. Australia's most populous state has been subject to a large outbreak of wildfires because of drought conditions. Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images

People cover their faces with masks to avoid thick smog in New Delhi on Nov. 5. People living there have complained about respiratory problems. Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images

Methane emitted by ruminant animals such as cattle and sheep accounted for 34% of New Zealand's greenhouse emissions in 2017. A flock of merino sheep on the country's South Island is seen here in April 2017. William West/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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William West/AFP via Getty Images

Ron Peters gives a tour of the rivers and waterways that run through Ellicott City. Peters installed security cameras around Ellicott City after the 2016 flood to learn more about how flooding in Ellicott City happens. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Bob Murray at the St. Clairsville, Ohio, headquarters of Murray Energy, which has declared bankruptcy. The coal executive pushed the Trump administration to roll back environmental regulations. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Despite Bankruptcy And Illness, Bob Murray Remains A Loud Voice For Coal

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Fallen whale carcasses, abundant in the deep-sea, are now studied as ecosystems unto themselves. Craig Smith and Mike deGruy hide caption

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Craig Smith and Mike deGruy

What Happens After A Whale Dies?

What happens after a whale dies? Their carcasses, known as "whale falls," provide a sudden, concentrated food source for organisms in the deep sea. Biologist Diva Amon is our guide through whale-fall ecosystems and the unique species that exist on the bones of these fallen whales. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia and reporter Emily Kwong @emilykwong1234. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

What Happens After A Whale Dies?

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A vineyard worker drives a grape harvester tractor in the Bordeaux region of southwestern France, where climate change is raising new challenges for winemakers. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Russian research vessel Akademik Fedorov helped search for the MOSAiC ice floe. It made its way through the ice of the central Arctic Ocean. Ravenna Koenig/NPR hide caption

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Ravenna Koenig/NPR

Searching For Solid Ice As Scientists 'Freeze In' To Study A Warming Arctic

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Coal ash swirls on the surface of the Dan River following one of the worst coal-ash spills in U.S. history into the river in Danville, Va., in February 2014. The Environmental Protection Agency wants to ease restrictions on coal ash and wastewater from coal plants. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

The Trump administration has formally notified the United Nations that it is withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement. The move comes as climate change drives more frequent and severe wildfires, hurricanes — such as Hurricane Florence in 2018 — and other hazards. Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images

U.S. Formally Begins To Leave The Paris Climate Agreement

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Harry Nevak (left) starts filling his boat in Newtok with his family's belongings in order to move them over to Mertarvik. Marc Lester/ Anchorage Daily News hide caption

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Marc Lester/ Anchorage Daily News

Residents Of An Eroded Alaskan Village Are Pioneering A New One, In Phases

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Lake Shinji, near Japan's coast, is known for its beauty. Until about a decade ago, the lake was also home to thriving fisheries. New research suggests runoff of the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, used on nearby rice paddies, may be responsible for declining fish populations. Gyro Photography/amanaimagesRF/Getty Images hide caption

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Gyro Photography/amanaimagesRF/Getty Images

Controversial Pesticides Are Suspected Of Starving Fish

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