Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Tyler Holland guides his bike through the water as winds from Tropical Storm Barry push water from Lake Pontchartrain over the seawall Saturday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is recommending attendance be capped at existing levels for the next 10 years at the annual Burning Man counterculture festival in the desert 100 miles north of Reno, Nev. Burning Man organizers had proposed raising the current 80,000 limit as high as 100,000 in coming years. Ron Lewis/AP hide caption

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Ron Lewis/AP

Dr. Mary Rice walks with Michael Howard at a Beth Israel Deaconess HealthCare clinic in Chealsea, Mass, as they test his oxygen levels with the addition of oxygen from a portable tank. He has COPD, a progressive lung disease that can be exacerbated by heat and humidity. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Has Your Doctor Talked To You About Climate Change?

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A stretch of the Mississippi River from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, La., that is crowded with chemical plants has been called "Cancer Alley" because of the health problems there. Giles Clarke/Getty Images hide caption

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Giles Clarke/Getty Images

A street in Miami flooded during a high tide in 2018. A new report confirms that the number of days with high-tide flooding is increasing in many U.S. cities as sea levels rise. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

High-Tide Flooding On The Rise, Especially Along The East Coast, Forecasters Warn

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Residents and relatives of victims place messages on the bridge over the Paraopeba River, during a tribute to those who died after a tailings dam collapsed in the town of Brumadinho, Brazil. Douglas Magno /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Magno /AFP/Getty Images

High in fiber and protein, chickpeas are playing a starring role on menus at fast-casual chains like Little Sesame in Washington, where hummus bowls abound. Chickpeas also are good for soil health — and growing demand could help restore soils depleted by decades of intensive farming. Anna Meyer hide caption

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Anna Meyer

French Transport Minister Elisabeth Borne says a new tax on airfares "is a response to the ecological urgency and sense of injustice expressed by the French." She's seen here with Minister for the Ecological and Inclusive Transition Francois de Rugy. Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/Pool / Reuters

Waveland and other beaches in Mississippi are closed because of a large algae bloom along the coast. The beach is seen here last September, as storm clouds from Tropical Storm Gordon approached. Jonathan Bachman/Reuters hide caption

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Jonathan Bachman/Reuters

By one estimate, emissions from producing and incinerating plastics could amount to 56 gigatons of carbon — almost 50 times the annual emissions of all of the coal power plants in the U.S. — between now and 2050. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

Plastic Has A Big Carbon Footprint — But That Isn't The Whole Story

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East West Market in Vancouver, British Columbia, offered single-use plastic bags with embarrassing slogans to encourage customers to utilize reusable bags. Courtesy of East West Market hide caption

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Courtesy of East West Market

How A Grocery Store's Plan To Shame Customers Into Using Reusable Bags Backfired

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A trash picker carries a sack of recyclable materials she collected at the Ghazipur landfill in the east of New Delhi. Xavier Galiana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Xavier Galiana/AFP/Getty Images

A Day's Work On Delhi's Mountain Of Trash

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A new law in Puerto Rico sets an ambitious timetable for the shift to renewable energy, including solar power. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico Harnesses The Power Of The Sun For A Renewable Energy Future

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People hike on the Byron Glacier on Thursday in Girdwood, Alaska, southeast of Anchorage. Many cities set heat records amid unusually hot and dry conditions in the area. Lance King/Getty Images hide caption

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Lance King/Getty Images