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A vineyard worker drives a grape harvester tractor in the Bordeaux region of southwestern France, where climate change is raising new challenges for winemakers. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Nattapong Kaweeantawong, a third-generation owner of Wattana Panich, stirs the soup while his mother (left) helps serve and his wife (center) does other jobs at the restaurant. Nattapong or another family member must constantly stir the thick brew. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Soup's On! And On! Thai Beef Noodle Brew Has Been Simmering For 45 Years

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Lake Shinji, near Japan's coast, is known for its beauty. Until about a decade ago, the lake was also home to thriving fisheries. New research suggests runoff of the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, used on nearby rice paddies, may be responsible for declining fish populations. Gyro Photography/amanaimagesRF/Getty Images hide caption

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Gyro Photography/amanaimagesRF/Getty Images

Controversial Pesticides Are Suspected Of Starving Fish

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Nestlé USA is announcing a voluntary recall for some of its ready-to-bake refrigerated cookie dough products. Sacramento Bee/Tribune News Service via Getty I hide caption

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Sacramento Bee/Tribune News Service via Getty I

In a new book of essays, literary luminaries share stories of surviving dark times and the foods tied to those memories. Think of it as a cathartic dinner party. Meryl Rowin hide caption

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Meryl Rowin

Shannan Troncoso, co-owner of Brookland's Finest Bar & Kitchen in Washington, D.C., has turned her customers into fans of Brussels sprouts. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

From Culinary Dud To Stud: How Dutch Plant Breeders Built Our Brussels Sprouts Boom

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A young girl paints a pumpkin teal to signify that a place is safe for children with food allergies to go trick-or-treating. Courtesy of Food Allergy Research & Education hide caption

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Courtesy of Food Allergy Research & Education

Fresh Corner Café sells loose fruits and fresh pre-packaged items like salads, sandwich wraps and fruit cups to corner stores, grocery stores and gas stations. Courtesy of Valaurian Waller hide caption

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Courtesy of Valaurian Waller

A winemaker pours rosé at the Chateau Sainte Roseline in the southern France region of Provence. European producers of premium specialty agricultural products like French wine, face a U.S. tariff hike with duties on a range of European goods, including wine. Daniel Cole/AP hide caption

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Daniel Cole/AP

Where There's A Wine, There's A Way

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'Mixtape Potluck' Is Inspired By Questlove's 'Food Salon' Dinner Parties

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A mix of barley, peas and flax grows in a field at Casey Bailey's farm near Fort Benton, Mont. Bailey sells this crop to Montana dairy farmer Nate Brown, who has been feeding it to his goats. Casey Bailey hide caption

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Casey Bailey

Ann Kim, owner of Hello Pizza in Edina, Minn., holds a Sicilian pan pie and a Hello Rita pizza. "Women can make progress in pizza that is harder in the macho restaurant world," Kim says. Bruce Bisping/Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bisping/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Kamel Guemari is a manager of a McDonald's in a neighborhood in Marseille, France, that's known for crime and drug gangs. He has been leading an employee charge to save the restaurant, which has become a vital community anchor in an under-resourced immigrant neighborhood. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Save The .... McDonald's? One Franchise In France Has Become A Social Justice Cause

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In the forests near the southern Sumatran village of Krui, 48-year-old Marhana climbs up the trees to harvest damar, a resin used in paints and varnishes. These damar trees are part of something called an "agroforest," which experts see as a way to prevent deforestation and conversion of forests into palm oil plantations. Julia Simon for NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon for NPR

Could This Tree Be An Eco-Friendly Way To Wean Indonesian Farmers Off Palm Oil?

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Unlike most dairy cows in America, which are descended from just two bulls, this cow at Pennsylvania State University has a different ancestor: She is the daughter of a bull that lived decades ago, called University of Minnesota Cuthbert. The bull's frozen semen was preserved by the U.S. Agriculture Department. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls. That's Not Good

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Companies are increasingly concerned about how Earth's changing climate might affect their businesses, such as crop failures from drought, heat and storms. Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image

As The Climate Warms, Companies Scramble To Calculate The Risk To Their Profits

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