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A new set of analyses contradict the current dietary recommendations to limit red and processed meats. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

No Need To Cut Back On Red Meat? Controversial New 'Guidelines' Lead To Outrage

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Corn from a fall harvest in Guatemala. John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images hide caption

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John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images

In Guatemala, A Bad Year For Corn — And For U.S. Aid

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U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds. R.Tsubin/Getty Images hide caption

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R.Tsubin/Getty Images

Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age

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A Swedish government program called the Edible Country recruited Michelin-starred chefs to create recipes that use ingredients that can be foraged from the areas around 13 picnic tables scattered across the countryside. Diners book a table, show up and hunt for their own food. Tina Stafrén/Visit Sweden hide caption

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Tina Stafrén/Visit Sweden

President Trump signed a partial trade agreement along with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in New York, where the two leaders are attending the United Nations General Assembly. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A selection of small feeding vessels dating back to the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age. Researchers now say vessels like these were used as prehistoric baby bottles. Katharina Rebay-Salisbury hide caption

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Katharina Rebay-Salisbury

An engraving dating from the 19th century depicts passenger pigeons, once one of the most common birds in North America but now extinct because of overhunting and deforestation. Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty

A diver maintains an open-water cage where tuna are being farmed in Izmir, Turkey. In the U.S., federally controlled ocean waters have been off limits to aquaculture, curbing the industry's growth. But the tide may be turning. Mahmut Serdar Alakus/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmut Serdar Alakus/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Stephen Tilder, the executive chef at Chase Field in Phoenix, holds the SI Cover Dog, a collaboration with a Sports Illustrated reporter. Bridget Dowd/KJZZ hide caption

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Bridget Dowd/KJZZ

For Arizona Baseball Fans, A Stadium Bratwurst Meant To 'Blow Their Mind'

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An employee handles sides of pork on a conveyor at a Smithfield Foods Inc. pork processing facility in Milan, Mo. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

USDA Offers Pork Companies A New Inspection Plan, Despite Opposition

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Illustration from a 19th-century edition of Robinson Crusoe, a novel by Daniel Defoe first published in 1719. It relates the story of Robinson Crusoe, stranded on an island for 28 years and his subsequent fight for survival. Out of desperation, he became a master of innovation, especially at preparing meals. Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

An adult spotted lanternfly searches for tasty grapevines at Vynecrest Vineyards and Winery, near Allentown, Pa. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Vineyards Facing An Insect Invasion May Turn To Aliens For Help

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Workers sort through bundles of vanilla at the Virginia Dare warehouse in Antsirabe Nord, Madagascar. When this photo was taken last year, the warehouse contained roughly $5 million worth of vanilla. Tommy Trenchard hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard

The Revolutionary History Of Mooncakes

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