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Ketchup And See Where Your Favorite French Fries Rank With The 'Los Angeles Times'

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Workers sort onions at a wholesale market in Maharashtra. The state is India's biggest onion producer. Prices have fallen drastically because of a surplus and fewer exports. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

'I Rue The Day We Ever Became Farmers': In Rural India, A Struggle To Survive

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Gulls were eating more juvenile salmon than biologists realized, which meant fewer of the fish were making it to the ocean. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

'Zaitoun': Recipes From The Palestinian Kitchen

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Pastry chef Katlyn Beggs and chef Patrick Mulvaney plan desserts for an upcoming dinner at his B&L restaurant in the Midtown neighborhood of Sacramento, Calif. Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Brent Henderson harvests soybeans on his farm near Weona, Ark., in 2017. That crop showed symptoms of dicamba exposure. Henderson switched to Xtend soybeans the following year, he says, as "insurance" against future damage. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Is Fear Driving Sales Of Monsanto's Dicamba-Proof Soybeans?

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Lunch clubs are becoming a popular trend in offices as a way for co-workers to brighten each other's days by sharing meals they've prepared for one another. They might eat together or at their own separate desks. Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons

The Real Super Bowl Drama Wasn't During The Game, But The Beer Commercials

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A row of new reverse vending machines, which collect drink containers for recycling, greets customers at the grand opening of the BottleDrop Redemption Center in Medford, Ore. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting

For passionate football fans, it's not just bragging rights on the line Sunday: Waistlines are too. Research suggests whether your team wins or loses can alter how you perceive the taste of food, and how much you eat, even the day after. Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr hide caption

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Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr

Soda bottles displayed in a San Francisco market.A federal appeals court blocked a city law requiring advertisement warnings on the potential health impacts of sugary drinks. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Bassam Ghraoui, who ran Syria's most famous chocolate factory, left for Hungary when war consumed his home country. He successfully rebuilt his business in Budapest. The company still uses ingredients from Syria. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

A Syrian Chocolatier's Legend Lives On In Europe — But Stays Close To Its Roots

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