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Powder methamphetamine packaged in foil for an illegal street sale. Across the U.S., more and more opioid users report using methamphetamine as well as opioids — up from 19% in 2011 to 34% in 2017, according to one study. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Meth In The Morning, Heroin At Night: Inside The Seesaw Struggle of Dual Addiction

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Liv Cannon and her fiancé, Cole Chiumento, considered calling off their wedding because of uncertainty over medical debt from her surgery. "I think about it every time I go to the mailbox," Cannon says. Julia Robinson for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Julia Robinson for Kaiser Health News

A Year After Spinal Surgery, A $94,031 Bill Feels Like A Backbreaker

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Oxycodone pain pills prescribed for a patient with chronic pain are photographed in 2016. Attorneys unveiled a plan Friday morning which they say would move the nation closer to a global settlement of lawsuits stemming from the deadly opioid crisis. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Architecture For Possible Nationwide Opioid Settlement Unveiled

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In many rural areas, helicopters are the only speedy way to get patients to a trauma center or hospital burn unit. As more than 100 rural hospitals have closed around the U.S. since 2010, the need for air transport has only increased. Ollo/Getty Images hide caption

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Presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden publicly switched his position on the Hyde Amendment under pressure from other Democrats. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Ban On Abortion Funding Stays In House Bill As 2020 Democrats Promise Repeal

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Drug agents last fall worked with a Minneapolis police SWAT team to seize just under 171 pounds of methamphetamine. Many U.S. states say they face an escalating problem with meth and drugs other than opioids. Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP hide caption

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Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP

Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law. Mary Smyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Smyth/Getty Images

Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

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'Patients Will Die': One County's Challenge To Trump's 'Conscience Rights' Rule

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In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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Thor Ringler (right) interviewed Ray Miller (left) in Miller's hospital room at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital in Madison, Wis., in April. Miller's daughter Barbara (center) brought in photos and a press clipping from Miller's time in the National Guard to help facilitate the conversation. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Storytelling Helps Hospital Staff Discover The Person Within The Patient

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Georgia state Rep. Erica Thomas speaks during a protest against recently passed abortion-ban bills at the state Capitol on May 21 in Atlanta. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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The best help for patients struggling with addiction, eating disorders or other mental health problems sometimes includes intensive therapy, the evidence shows. But many patients still have trouble getting their health insurers to cover needed mental health treatment. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Former nurse Niels Högel was found guilty of killing patients in his care by injecting them with drugs and then trying to resuscitate them. He's seen here in court, awaiting his verdict in Oldenburg, Germany. Hauke-Christian Dittrich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hauke-Christian Dittrich/AFP/Getty Images

A proposed change in a formula for Medicare payments could help rural hospitals but would mean less money for hospitals in cities. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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At least 43 million Americans have overdue medical bills on their credit reports, according to a 2014 report on medical debt by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images hide caption

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Charges for nitrous oxide during labor and delivery haven't been standardized. Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful hide caption

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Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful

Bill Of The Month: $4,836 Charge For Laughing Gas During Childbirth Is No Joke

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