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A chimpanzee hugs her newborn at Burgers' Zoo in Arnhem, Netherlands, in 2010. Over the course of his long career, primatologist Frans de Waal has become convinced that primates and other animals express emotions similar to human emotions. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Sex, Empathy, Jealousy: How Emotions And Behavior Of Other Primates Mirror Our Own

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The reality of electronic medical records has yet to live up to the promise. suedhang/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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suedhang/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Why The Promise Of Electronic Health Records Has Gone Unfulfilled

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Dr. Homer Venters, the former head of New York City's correctional health services, says that inmates held in solitary confinement cells, such as the Rikers Island cell shown above, have a higher risk of committing self-harm. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Former Physician At Rikers Island Exposes Health Risks Of Incarceration

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For people with a rare condition known as misophonia, certain sounds like slurping, chewing, tapping and clicking can elicit intense feelings of rage or panic. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Misophonia: When Life's Noises Drive You Mad

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Various forms of dementia can take very different courses, so it's important to get the right diagnosis. Mehau Kulyk/Science Source hide caption

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Mehau Kulyk/Science Source

Is It Alzheimer's Or Another Dementia? The Right Answer Matters

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Former speaker of the house John Boehner has emerged as one of the most vocal advocates in the GOP for legalizing marijuana. Above, Boehner answers questions at the U.S. Capitol on December 5, 2013. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

John Boehner Was Once 'Unalterably Opposed' To Marijuana. He Now Wants It To Be Legal

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A study found that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Esco brings his dog Nibbler to a park in Jackson, Miss. He's was diagnosed with HIV 11 years ago and has stayed healthy, but the same can't be said of many of the other HIV-positive people in his life. L. Kasimu Harris for NPR hide caption

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L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Ending HIV In Mississippi Means Cutting Through Racism, Poverty And Homophobia

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Federal records show that the average fine for a health or safety infraction by a nursing home dropped to $28,405 under the Trump administration, down from $41,260 in 2016, President Obama's final year in office. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

During the era that social media and smartphones has risen, depression and stress among young people has also risen. Roy James Shakespeare/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy James Shakespeare/Getty Images

A Rise In Depression Among Teens And Young Adults Could Be Linked To Social Media Use

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The college admissions and bribery scandal revealed that some were taking advantage of a system meant to help students with disabilities. Ryan Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Ryan Johnson for NPR

Why The College Admissions Scandal Hurts Students With Disabilities

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There can be as many as 35 different inactive ingredients inside a medicine. Monty Rakusen/Getty Images hide caption

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Monty Rakusen/Getty Images

Overlooked Ingredients In Medicines Can Sometimes Trigger Side Effects

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There was an uproar in 2018 when a scientist in China, He Jiankui, announced that he had successfully used CRISPR to edit the genes of twin girls when they were embryos. Prominent scientists hope to stop further attempts at germline editing, at least for now. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies

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"What's important to me is that the facts come to light, and we get justice and accountability," Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said about litigation that has made internal Purdue Pharma documents public. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Opioid Litigation Brings Company Secrets Into The Public Eye

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