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Activists from Girl Up. Top row from left: Valeria Colunga, Eugenie Park, Angelica Almonte, Emily Lin. Bottom row from left: Lauren Woodhouse, Winter Ashley, Zulia Martinez, Paola Moreno-Roman. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

The Trump administration has suggested buying a prescription drug is like buying a car — with plenty of room to negotiate down from the sticker price. But drug pricing analysts say the analogy doesn't work. tomeng/Getty Images hide caption

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Car Shopping, Handbags And Wealthy Uncles: The Quest To Explain High Drug Prices

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A menstrual cup — this one is made of silicone rubber — is designed to collect menstrual blood. The bell-shaped device is folded and inserted into the vagina. The tip helps with removal. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source
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Researchers Explore Why Women's Alzheimer's Risk Is Higher Than Men's

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Alexis Conell battled end-stage renal disease for years before receiving her kidney transplant in 2012. Paying for the drugs needed to keep her kidneys healthy is a struggle. Taylor Glascock for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Taylor Glascock for Kaiser Health News

Protesters gathered outside of Police Headquarters in Manhattan in May during the police disciplinary hearing for Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who has been accused of using a chokehold that led to Eric Garner's death in 2014. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

5 Years After Eric Garner's Death, Activists Continue Fight For 'Another Day To Live'

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Federal Judge Orders Release Of Dataset Showing Drug Industry's Role In Opioid Crisis

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Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter begins closing statements during the opioid trial at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla., on Monday, July 15. It's the first public trial to emerge from roughly 2,000 U.S. lawsuits aimed at holding drugmakers accountable for the nation's opioid epidemic. Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman

Pain Meds As Public Nuisance? Oklahoma Tests A Legal Strategy For Opioid Addiction

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Bacteria (purple) in the bloodstream can trigger sepsis, a life-threatening illness. Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource

Regulations That Mandate Sepsis Care Appear To Have Worked In New York

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Medicare Advantage plans, administered by private insurance companies under contract with Medicare, treat more than 22 million seniors — more than 1 in 3 people on Medicare. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Huge crowds turn up each week to watch a game of baseball on a woodchip field, where the players wear snowshoes. Mackenzie Martin/WXPR hide caption

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Mackenzie Martin/WXPR

Crowds Gather Each Week In Wisconsin To Watch Their Teams Play Ball — In Snowshoes

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Taking care of a newborn can be relentless and at some point, many parents need the baby to sleep — alone and quietly — for a few hours. So what does science say about the controversial practice of sleep training? Scott Bakal for NPR hide caption

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Scott Bakal for NPR

Sleep Training Truths: What Science Can (And Can't) Tell Us About Crying It Out

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Empty baby beds stand in the maternity ward of a hospital (a spokesperson for the hospital asked that the hospital not be named). Six days after Farai Chideya took her adopted newborn child home from a hospital, she was forced to give him back to his birth mother. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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