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Authorities perform an active shooter drill at Park High School on April 27, 2018 in Livingston, Mont. Some experts question the methods of active shooter drills. William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images

Experts Worry Active Shooter Drills In Schools Could Be Traumatic For Students

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Maryland now offers the country's first master's degree in the study of the science and therapeutics of cannabis. Pictured, an employee places a bud into a bottle for a customer at a weed dispensary in Denver, Colo. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

You Can Get A Master's In Medical Cannabis In Maryland

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Fish broker Khout Phany, 39, (under umbrella) sits while fishermen bring their catch to be weighed in Chhnok Tru, a fishing village at the southern tip of the Tonle Sap lake where it meets the river. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

Mourners hold candles as they gather for a vigil at a memorial outside Cielo Vista Walmart in El Paso, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said Friday that fluid extracted from the lungs of 29 injured patients who vaped all contained the chemical compound vitamin E acetate. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

Brelahn Wyatt, a Navy ensign and second-year medical student, shares a hug with Shetland. The dog's military commission does not entitle him to salutes. Julie Rovner/KHN hide caption

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Julie Rovner/KHN

People cover their faces with masks to avoid thick smog in New Delhi on Nov. 5. People living there have complained about respiratory problems. Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images

Two fourth-graders rock side to side while doing math equations at Charles Pinckney Elementary School's "Brain Room" in Charleston, S.C., in 2015. John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Indonesians independently carry out fumigation in their neighborhood to eradicate the larvae of mosquitoes that cause dengue fever. A new vaccine to prevent dengue may be on the horizon. Aditya Irawan/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Aditya Irawan/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Melinda McDowell sought treatment for her addiction to meth. She started taking the medication naltrexone and has been sober for more than a year now. Andrea Dukakis/CPR News hide caption

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Andrea Dukakis/CPR News

A Medication To Treat Meth Addiction? Some Take A New Look At Naltrexone

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Unwed pregnant women in China face a legal gray zone where they are unable to access public services for themselves and their children. I Gede Bhaskara Ryandika/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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I Gede Bhaskara Ryandika/Getty Images/EyeEm

In China, Kids Of Unwed Mothers May Be Barred From Public Health Care, Education

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Roger Severino, director of the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, was a major driver of the rule struck down Wednesday. A federal judge found the rule issued earlier this year — making it easier for health care workers to refuse care for religious reasons — to be an overreach by the department. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Malassezia is a genus of fungi naturally found on the skin surfaces of many animals, including humans. The researchers found it in urban apartments, although some strains have been known to cause infections in hospitals. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The preliminary results described Wednesday come from two patients with multiple myeloma and one with sarcoma. This was just a first safety test, the scientists say, and was not designed to measure whether such a treatment would work. Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test

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Tom and Dana Saputo sit in their backyard with their three dogs. Tom Saputo's double-lung transplant was fully covered by insurance, but he was responsible for an $11,524.79 portion of the charge for an air ambulance ride. Anna Almendrala/KHN hide caption

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Anna Almendrala/KHN