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Louise and Daivd Turpin, who pleaded guilty to 14 felony counts for the abuse of 12 their 13 children, listened on Friday as two of their adult children testified in court. Will Lester/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Lester/AFP/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he was spurred to act because of an "unprecedented spike" in the number of teenagers who were vaping, or smoking e-cigarettes. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler has said, "This committee requires the full report and the underlying materials because it is our job — not the attorney general's — to determine whether or not President Trump has abused his office." Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

The Washington state Senate passed a bill on Wednesday that would remove the personal belief exemption from the required vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella. Here, people protest the related house bill outside Washington's Legislative Building in Olympia in February. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

In addition to investigating Russian attacks on the 2016 presidential election, special counsel Robert Mueller also was tasked with looking into "any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Attorney General William Barr speaks about the redacted version of the Mueller report as U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (right) and U.S. Acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Ed O'Callaghan listen at the Department of Justice Thursday before the document's release. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The writers' union says that talent agencies are taking too large a share in the deals they negotiate, and that conflicts of interest may prevent them from working in their clients' best interest. David Livingston/Getty Images hide caption

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David Livingston/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General William Barr decided on Tuesday that asylum-seekers who clear a "credible fear" interview and are facing removal don't have the right to be released on bond by an immigration court judge while their cases are pending. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Trump participates in a roundtable on immigration and border security at the U.S. Border Patrol Calexico Station in Calexico, Calif., on April 5. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Assistant Attorney General Brian Benczkowski said Wednesday that if doctors or pharmacists behave like drug dealers, the Justice Department would prosecute them accordingly. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Los Angeles artist Erik Brunetti, the founder of the streetwear clothing company "FUCT," leaves the Supreme Court after his trademark case was argued on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Dances Around The F-Word With Real Potential Financial Consequences

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Actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli (left), announced on Monday that they would plead not guilty to charges in the Justice Department's college admissions case. Here, they leave federal court in Boston earlier this month. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP