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Caissie Levy performs as Elsa in the stage adaptation of Frozen, which opened on Broadway in 2018. Deen van Meer/Disney Theatrical Productions hide caption

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Deen van Meer/Disney Theatrical Productions

For Many With Disabilities, 'Let It Go' Is An Anthem Of Acceptance

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Gladys Knight will "give the anthem back its voice," she said in a statement explaining her decision to sing the national anthem at Super Bowl LIII in spite of boycotts by other black artists. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Hundreds of singers joined MILCK and the Canadian choral group Choir! Choir! Choir! to perform "Quiet" at Toronto's Phoenix Concert Theatre in early 2017. Andrew Williamson/Courtesy of Choir! Choir! Choir! hide caption

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Andrew Williamson/Courtesy of Choir! Choir! Choir!

A Song Called 'Quiet' Struck A Chord With Women. Two Years Later, It's Still Ringing

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Sketches of performers from NPR Music's Tiny Desk concerts. Top row, left to right: The Midnight Hour, dvsn, Dirty Projectors. Bottom row, left to right: Liniker e os Caramelows, boygenius, Florence + The Machine. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Nina Simone onstage at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1968. David Redfern/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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David Redfern/Redferns/Getty Images

Nina Simone's 'Lovely, Precious Dream' For Black Children

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Soul singer Aretha Franklin poses for a portrait in 1964. Michael Ochs Archives/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

In Memoriam 2018: The Musicians We Lost

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Kacey Musgraves had one of country music's biggest albums of 2018, but it came only after she shrugged off any lingering obligation to pursue radio airplay. Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Stagecoach hide caption

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Stagecoach

A statue of George M. Cohan, prolific Broadway composer and performer, stands in New York's Times Square. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

George M. Cohan, 'The Man Who Created Broadway,' Was An Anthem Machine

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Pussy Riot's performance at SXSW — one of Ann Powers' favorite concert experiences of 2018 — felt like an occupation of the senses. Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW

Ronnie Van Zant in 1975, onstage with Lynyrd Skynyrd at the Omni Coliseum in Atlanta. Tom Hill/WireImage hide caption

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Tom Hill/WireImage

Unfurling 'Sweet Home Alabama,' A Tapestry Of Southern Discomfort

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Bruce Springsteen Springsteen on Broadway, which will have its final date on Dec. 15, 2018. The show has been documented in a new film, to be released just after that final performance. Danny Clinch/Shore Fire Media hide caption

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Danny Clinch/Shore Fire Media

A photograph of jazz pianist James Reese Europe projected above the musicians performing Jason Moran's James Reese Europe and the Absence of Ruin. Camille Blake/courtesy of JazzFest Berlin hide caption

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Camille Blake/courtesy of JazzFest Berlin

Ernie Isley (left) of The Isley Brothers and Chuck D of Public Enemy met at Mr Musichead Gallery in Los Angeles to discuss their respective versions of "Fight the Power." Nickolai Hammar/NPR hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR

'Fight The Power': A Tale Of 2 Anthems (With The Same Name)

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