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Majid Takht Ravanchi, Iran's ambassador to the United Nations, pictured here in 2015 at a news conference in Mexico City. In an exclusive interview with NPR, Ravanchi said flaring tensions between Washington and Tehran have made diplomatic talks hostile. Daniel Cardenas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Cardenas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Iran's U.N. Ambassador: U.S. Escalating Hostilities Like A 'Knife Under Your Throat'

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The U.S. Navy says a limpet mine put a hole in this Panama-flagged, Japanese-owned tanker anchored off Fujairah, United Arab Emirates. The limpet mines used to attack the tanker near the Strait of Hormuz resemble mines displayed by Iran, a Navy explosives expert said Wednesday. Iran denies being involved. Fay Abuelgasim/AP hide caption

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Fay Abuelgasim/AP

President Trump, shown at an event in Montoursville, Pa., in May, is calling a rally in Orlando, Fla., on Tuesday a campaign kickoff. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Threatens To Deport 'Millions,' As He Kicks Off Campaign For Reelection

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An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter takes off from the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln in the Red Sea. The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group was recently deployed to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility as tensions between the U.S. and Iran escalate. On Monday, the State Department ordered additional troops to the Middle East. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amber Smalley/U.S. Navy via Getty Images hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amber Smalley/U.S. Navy via Getty Images

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and Chinese President Xi Jinping meet in Beijing in January. The two leaders plan to meet this week in North Korea, according to state news agencies of both countries. Li Xueren/AP hide caption

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Li Xueren/AP

Atomic Energy Organization of Iran spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi, pictured at a July 2018 news conference in Tehran, said Monday: "We have quadrupled the rate of enrichment and even increased it more recently." Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Rear Adm. Shoshana Chatfield sits at a mission crew work station in Guam. Chatfield has been named the next president of the Naval War College. Daniel Willoughby/U.S. Navy hide caption

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Daniel Willoughby/U.S. Navy

President Trump speaks with reporters at the White House on Tuesday. He told ABC News that he would be open to hearing information about rival presidential candidates from a foreign government. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

FACT CHECK: Foreign Interference And 'Opposition Research' Are Not The Same

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TV personality Jon Stewart at a hearing by the House Judiciary Committee as it considers permanent authorization of the Victim Compensation Fund on Capitol Hill in Washington. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Trump, pictured in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on June 12, spoke with ABC News about whether he would accept damaging information about a 2020 rival from another government. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

F/A-18 Super Hornet is launched by a steam-powered catapult off the USS Theodore Roosevelt during naval exercises in the Gulf of Alaska. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

The U.S.-based Free Russia Foundation accuses Russia of exploiting Western legal systems. Above, supporters of arrested journalist Ivan Golunov (freed on Tuesday) gathered at a court building in Moscow. Dmitry Serebryakov/AP hide caption

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Dmitry Serebryakov/AP

U.S. Customs and Border Protection security cameras scan license plates as motor vehicles cross the U.S.-Mexico border from Tijuana, Mexico, in September 2016 in San Ysidro, Calif. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., says the Justice Department has agreed to release some information related to the special counsel report on Russian election interference. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

After she was detained, CIA officer Marti Peterson was taken to the KGB headquarters, Lubyanka, in central Moscow. She was held for four hours and kicked out of the Soviet Union the next day. She went on to work another 26 years for the CIA. H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum hide caption

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H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum

'Moscow Rules': How The CIA Operated Under The Watchful Eye Of The KGB

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