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Universities Scour Yearbooks After Northam

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U.S. National Debt Passes $22 Trillion

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If The U.S. And China Don't Reach A Trade Deal, Consumers Will Soon Feel The Impact

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SPLC On Suing Trump Over Asylum-Seeker Policy

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The Power Of Congress After Trump's Emergency Declaration

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Former CBP Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske On Trump's Border Declaration

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A legal battle is expected to come down to one question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall, like that at Tijuana, Mexico, and, instead get it by declaring a national emergency? Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's National Emergency Sets Up Legal Fight Over Spending Authority

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Alexsis Rodgers, president of Virginia Young Democrats, is one of the disappointed constituents who worked hard to elect some of the officials at the center of the Virginia controversies. Now, Rodgers says, the state democratic party must develop diverse leaders before there's another crisis. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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