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Visiting the U.S. to have a baby — and secure a U.S. passport for the child — is not "a legitimate activity for pleasure or of a recreational nature," the State Department says. Benny Snyder/AP hide caption

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Benny Snyder/AP

The Hankou Railway Station in Wuhan was closed as part of a shutdown on public transportation — an effort to control the spread of what's being called the Wuhan coronavirus. Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media via Getty Images

China Halts Transportation Out Of Wuhan To Contain Coronavirus. Could It Backfire?

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Actress Annabella Sciorra described in detail the alleged assault by Harvey Weinstein during his trial on Thursday. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Actress Annabella Sciorra Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Raped Her

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The Doomsday Clock reads 100 seconds to midnight, a decision made by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists that was announced Thursday. The clock is intended to represent the danger of global catastrophe. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

A worker piles boxes of strawberries inside the Ground Berries Association in northern Gaza. An unwritten deal between Israel and Hamas gives Gaza residents more access to jobs, trade and travel. Loay Ayyoub for NPR hide caption

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Loay Ayyoub for NPR

'Like A Prisoner Being Let Free': Israel-Hamas Truce Lends Hope To Gaza's Jobless

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An air tanker operated by Canada-based Coulson Aviation drops fire retardant on the Morton Fire burning in bushland close to homes at Penrose, south of Sydney, earlier this month. Dan Himbrechts/AAP Image via Reuters hide caption

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Dan Himbrechts/AAP Image via Reuters

The number of pets on planes has become a hot-button issue of late as emotional support animals have become more common than ever. Shelly Yang/Kansas City Star/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Shelly Yang/Kansas City Star/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Federal Government May Tighten Restrictions On Service Animals On Planes

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Kendra Espinoza stands with her daughters outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Espinoza is the lead plaintiff in a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Could Be Headed To A Major Unraveling Of Public School Funding

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Isabel dos Santos, seen here attending a screening of BlacKkKlansman at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival in France, has been accused of embezzlement and money laundering in Angola. Emma McIntyre/Getty Images hide caption

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Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

A photograph of Vladimir Munk, (center), taken in March 1938 before the Nazis invaded Czechoslovakia. After being imprisoned in concentration camps for years, Munk returned to his hometown of Pardubice, Czechoslovakia in May 1945 (right). Emily Russell/NCPR hide caption

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Emily Russell/NCPR

Alleged Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (far left) consults with his defense attorneys in the U.S. military courtroom in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, as a man who waterboarded him, retired Air Force psychologist James Mitchell, takes the stand. Janet Hamlin Illustration hide caption

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Janet Hamlin Illustration

Members of the Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living (INCIL) demonstrate in front of the Bloomington-Normal Amtrak station in Illinois to demand the suspension of an Amtrak policy that led to exorbitant fees for removing train seats to accommodate riders in wheelchairs. Later on Wednesday, Amtrak announced it would suspend the policy. Courtesy of Bridget Hayman hide caption

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Courtesy of Bridget Hayman

Amtrak Reverses Course On $25,000 Bill

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Then-Sen. James Jeffords, R-Vt.; then-Rep. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., drink glasses of milk in 1999. Senate rules during the impeachment trial of President Trump permit the consumption of milk on the chamber floor, a strange rule that has sparked a conversation on social media. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, was among a group of Senate Republicans who insisted that the time each side has to make its case be extended. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP