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At the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia on Friday, Nayab Khan, 22, cries at a vigil to mourn for the victims of the Christchurch mosque attacks in New Zealand. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

Coping With The Persistent Trauma Of Anti-Muslim Rhetoric And Violence

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In the wake of the college admissions scandal that has ensnared a slew of wealthy parents, college coaches and others in the world of academia, USC has placed a hold on the accounts of students allegedly connected to the scheme. Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images

A jury in federal court in San Francisco on Tuesday concluded that Roundup weed killer was a substantial factor in a California man's cancer. The company denies the connection. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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Haven Daley/AP

President Trump plans to nominate Stephen Dickson to lead the Federal Aviation Administration. The agency is under scrutiny for its response to two crashes of Boeing 737 airplanes, which are pictured here outside Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash., on March 14. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Kuang Yang burns a Chinese flag to protest human rights abuses, outside British Columbia Supreme Court in Vancouver on March 6, as Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou appears in court. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images

How Canada Gets Squeezed Between China And The U.S.

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Mohan Sudabattula, a senior at the University of Utah, shows posters he found on campus from the white nationalist group Patriot Front. Nate Hegyi/KUER hide caption

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Nate Hegyi/KUER

A police officer stands guard by a window riddled with bullet holes in an Ebola treatment center in Butembo, a city in Democratic Republic of the Congo. The center has been attacked twice in the last month. John Wessels/Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/Getty Images

What Needs To Be Done To End Congo's Ebola Crisis

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A chimpanzee hugs her newborn at Burgers' Zoo in Arnhem, Netherlands, in 2010. Over the course of his long career, primatologist Frans de Waal has become convinced that primates and other animals express emotions similar to human emotions. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Sex, Empathy, Jealousy: How Emotions And Behavior Of Other Primates Mirror Our Own

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For certain species, a market preference for plate-sized whole fillets is driving fishermen to target smaller fish, like these juvenile Malabar snappers. That means some wild fish aren't getting the chance to reproduce before they're caught. Andre Brugger hide caption

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Andre Brugger

Amy Klobuchar Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Amy Klobuchar Runs On A Record Of Accomplishments — Including With Republicans

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Dr. Hillary Tamar, who's in the second year of her family medicine residency in Phoenix, is part of a new generation of doctors who are committed to treating addiction. Jackie Hai/KJZZ hide caption

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Jackie Hai/KJZZ

Aspiring Doctors Seek Advanced Training In Addiction Medicine

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The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory is made up of two detectors, this one in Livingston, La., and one near Hanford, Wash. The detectors use giant arms in the shape of an "L" to measure tiny ripples in the fabric of the universe. Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab hide caption

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Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab

Massive U.S. Machines That Hunt For Ripples In Space-Time Just Got An Upgrade

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Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump walk on the South Lawn of the White House to board Marine One on their way to the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland on June 1, 2018. Yuri Gripas/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Fighters with the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces hold a position on a hilltop overlooking the last ISIS enclave in the village of Baghouz. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

Japan's Olympic Committee President Tsunekazu Takeda said Tuesday that he will step down in June, as French authorities probe his involvement in payments made before Tokyo was awarded the 2020 Summer Games. Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images