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Roger Allam as Prospero in William Shakespeare's The Tempest directed by Jeremy Herrin at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in London. Robbie Jack/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Robbie Jack/Corbis via Getty Images

Wanted: Stories With Happily Ever Afters - Here's Where To Start Looking

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Coach Elie Rwirangira conducts a basketball lesson through a live-streaming session at YBDL Campus in Shanghai, China on March 12. Many people and companies are providing free online classes to stay fit. Aly Song/Reuters hide caption

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Aly Song/Reuters

On Thursday afternoon, New York's Metropolitan Opera announced it was canceling all performances through the end of its 2019-20 season, which was to run through May 9. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

The current production of Riverdance was updated for its 25th anniversary. But performances have been postponed for the rest of the month because of the coronavirus pandemic. Jack Hartin hide caption

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Jack Hartin

'Riverdance' Turns 25, But Has Put The Celebration On Hold — For Now

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Laura Benanti performs in Washington in 2015. She recently asked high school students to send her videos of their musical theater performances after many of them were canceled. Paul Morigi/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images

A Broadway Star And #SunshineSongs Bring High School Musical Theater To Small Screens

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Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, photographed in New York on Aug. 19, 2007. The artist, best known for their work in the groups Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV, died on March 14, 2020. Neville Elder/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Neville Elder/Redferns/Getty Images

An empty Lincoln Center will be a much more common sight over the coming weeks; all its constituent organizations have all closed temporarily due to coronavirus worries. Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for IMG hide caption

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Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for IMG

Performing Arts And Cultural Organizations Close Their Doors Due To Coronavirus

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Working on Coal Country helped Steve Earle write his upcoming album, Ghosts of West Virginia. Seven songs from that record are featured in the play. Joan Marcus/Courtesy of the Public Theater hide caption

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Joan Marcus/Courtesy of the Public Theater

Featuring Music From Steve Earle, 'Coal Country' Recounts Deadly Mine Explosion

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Jerry Minor plays Michael Jackson's glove in For the Love of a Glove. The unauthorized, satirical musical is playing at The Carl Sagan & Ann Druyan Theater until March 22. For the Love of a Glove hide caption

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For the Love of a Glove

New Musical Imagines Michael Jackson's Story As Told By His Famous Glove

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David Alan Grier as Sergeant Vernon C. Waters, Blair Underwood as Captain Richard Davenport and Billy Eugene Jones as Private James Wilkie in A Soldier's Play. Joan Marcus hide caption

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Joan Marcus

After 40 Years, 'A Soldier's Play' Finally Marches Onto Broadway

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Encore: Reflections From Conversations With Women In Comedy

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"I'm a student first in everything that I do," says Nnamdi Asomugha. "So it's always about: How can I get the edge mentally?" Asomugha, shown above on the sidelines of an Oakland Raiders game in November 2010, is now making his Broadway debut. Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Pro Bowl To Broadway, This NFL Star Says The Stage Is Another 'Team Sport'

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Reflections From Conversations With Women In Comedy

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Director Bartlett Sher is now working on an opera based on Lynn Nottage's Intimate Apparel, and preparing the London premiere and national tour of To Kill A Mockingbird. He's shown above during a rehearsal in May 2006, in Seattle. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

One Director's Secrets To Success: Chaos, Confidence And 'Collective Genius'

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Jeremy O. Harris wasn't sure he even wanted Slave Play to be on Broadway. "It's literally just a plot of land in New York," he says. "And nobody wants to go to Time Square anyway." Tricia Baron hide caption

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Tricia Baron

Moni Yakim teaches a movement class at Juilliard in May 2019. Claudio Papapietro hide caption

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Claudio Papapietro

Moni Yakim Knows How To Move You

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