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Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, faced criticism after he sent a now-deleted tweet about the suspect in the stabbing attack in Monsey, N.Y. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Joe Biden Writes About 'Restoring The Soul Of Our Nation'

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Looking Back On Trump Administration's Tough Talk On Immigration

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President Barack Obama celebrates with lawmakers after signing into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act health insurance bill in March 2010. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

The Top Moments From A Decade That Reshaped American Politics

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Prisoners pass through a courtyard at Waupun Correctional Institution. Officials in some prison towns have come up with creative ways to avoid forming voting districts made up primarily of prisoners. But in many others, political lines are drawn around prisons in a way that critics deride as "prison gerrymandering." Lauren Justice for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Justice for NPR

'Your Body Being Used': Where Prisoners Who Can't Vote Fill Voting Districts

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A federal judge said a lawsuit filed by former deputy national security adviser Charles Kupperman is moot. The decision on Monday comes as the House of Representatives had said it will not hold Kupperman in contempt. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Demonstrators against the Trump administration's push to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in April. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Virginia Poised To Pass Equal Rights Amendment Nearly 5 Decades After It Was Proposed

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Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Trump this month. Lewis says he'll stay in office while he undergoes treatment for pancreatic cancer. House Television via AP hide caption

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House Television via AP

From The Tea Party To Trump: The GOP In The 2010s

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