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The Doomsday Clock reads 100 seconds to midnight, a decision made by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists that was announced Thursday. The clock is intended to represent the danger of global catastrophe. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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This chicken from Memphis Meats was produced with cells taken from an animal and grown into meat in a "cultivator." The process is analogous to how yeast is grown in breweries to produce beer. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Generics may not have the same cost-lowering power for specialty medicines, such as multiple sclerosis drugs, researchers find. That's true especially when other brand-name drugs are approved to treat a given disease before the first generic is approved. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Levi Draheim, 11, wears a dust mask as he participates in a demonstration in Miami in July 2019. A lawsuit filed by him and other young people urging action against climate change was thrown out by a federal appeals court Friday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court

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Parroquia Inmaculada Concepción church in Guayanilla was heavily damaged after a 6.4 earthquake hit Southern Puerto Rico on January 7. Eric Rojas/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Rojas/Getty Images

2020 So Far: Fires, Floods, And Quakes

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A team of Stanford University researchers designed the PigeonBot. Lentink Lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Lentink Lab/Stanford University

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight

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Scientists put several litters of wolf puppies through a standard battery of tests. Many pups, such as this one named Flea, wouldn't fetch a ball. But then something surprising happened. Christina Hansen Wheat hide caption

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Christina Hansen Wheat

Fetching With Wolves: What It Means That A Wolf Puppy Will Retrieve A Ball

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth

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A light micrograph of a primitive human embryo, composed of four cells, following the initial mitotic divisions that ultimately transform a single-cell organism into one composed of millions of cells. Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns

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For decades, the Earth has steadily gotten hotter. The planet has already warmed about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (or almost 1 degree Celsius) compared with in the mid-20th century. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

2019 Was The 2nd-Hottest Year On Record, According To NASA And NOAA

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Smoke from bushfires shrouds the Melbourne city skyline. Hazardous breathing conditions prompted Australian Open officials to suspend practice sessions on Tuesday. Daniel Pockett/Getty Images hide caption

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How Puberty, Pregnancy And Perimenopause Impact Women's Mental Health

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Much of New South Wales, Australia, including the Sydney Opera House, lay under a shroud of smoke Thursday. The state remains under severe or very high fire danger warnings as more than 60 fires continue to burn within its borders. Cassie Trotter/Getty Images hide caption

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Cassie Trotter/Getty Images

Firefighters conduct property protection patrols at the Dunn Road Fire on Friday in Mount Adrah, Australia. New South Wales is battling severe fire conditions, with high temperatures and strong winds forecast across the state. Sam Mooy/Getty Images hide caption

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With Their Land In Flames, Aboriginals Warn Fires Show Deep Problems In Australia

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Three U.S. airports will screen passengers from Wuhan, China, for coronavirus symptoms: Los Angeles International Airport (pictured above), JFK in New York and SFO in San Francisco. FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images hide caption

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