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Last year, Eliud Kipchoge became the first athlete to run a marathon in less than two hours. He was wearing a type of shoe that reportedly will not be allowed in elite competition in the future. Jed Leicester/AP hide caption

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Jed Leicester/AP

Making sure to frequently give your hands a thorough scrub — with soap and for about as long as it takes to sing the "Happy Birthday" song a couple of times — can significantly cut your chances of catching the flu or other respiratory virus. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Worried About Catching The New Coronavirus? In The U.S., Flu Is A Bigger Threat

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Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Muotri Lab/UCSD hide caption

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Muotri Lab/UCSD

Scientists Find Imperfections In 'Minibrains' That Raise Questions For Research

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The State Of A Potential Vaccine For The New Coronavirus

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A surgical mask and an N95 respirator. Officials in China are urging citizens to wear masks in public to stop the spread of the coronavirus. But can a mask really keep you from catching the virus? Science Photo Library/ Getty Images; South China Morning Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/ Getty Images; South China Morning Post/Getty Images

Face Masks: What Doctors Say About Their Role In Containing Coronavirus

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How Helpful Are Face Masks In Preventing The Spread Of Disease?

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Local health workers across the U.S. have been reaching out to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for guidance on how to screen, manage and treat potential cases of coronavirus. Currently, testing for the virus must take place at the CDC. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

A Travel Ban To Contain The Coronavirus Could Worsen Conditions In Wuhan

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Roughly 1 in 10 infants were born prematurely in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drug Makena is widely prescribed to women at high risk of going into labor early, though the latest research suggests the medicine doesn't work. Luis Davilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Davilla/Getty Images

The Doomsday Clock reads 100 seconds to midnight, a decision made by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists that was announced Thursday. The clock is intended to represent the danger of global catastrophe. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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This chicken from Memphis Meats was produced with cells taken from an animal and grown into meat in a "cultivator." The process is analogous to how yeast is grown in breweries to produce beer. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

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