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Cancer of the cervix is one of the most common cancers affecting women and can be fatal. Here, cervical cancer cells are dividing, as seen through a colored scanning electron micrograph. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival

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Arrangement of colored oviraptor-like eggs in an oviraptorid nest arrangement Jasmina Wiemann/Yale University hide caption

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Jasmina Wiemann/Yale University

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs

A new study found that birds' dinosaur relatives had eggs with traces of two pigments—a red-brown one and a blue-green one. In today's birds that might produce a color such as robin's egg blue.

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs

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Getting people of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds into clinical trials is not only a question of equity, doctors say. It's also a scientific imperative to make sure candidate drugs work and are safe in a broad cross-section of people. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Social Stigma Is One Reason The Opioid Crisis Is Hard To Confront

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Kim puts the finishing touches on a cassowary. Courtesy of Ink Dwell hide caption

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Courtesy of Ink Dwell

Feathered Friends Large And Small Flock On Cornell's 'Wall Of Birds'

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Oregon State University oceanographer Jack Barth deploys a glider that will spend weeks at sea collecting data on everything from dissolved oxygen levels to temperature. "When we used to think about hypoxia in the ocean, we think about little areas. But now what we're looking at is...out in the ocean, there's low oxygen...all along the coast," he says. Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Coastal Pacific Oxygen Levels Now Plummet Once A Year

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New research explores how people think autonomous vehicles should handle moral dilemmas. Here, people walk in front of an autonomous taxi being demonstrated in Frankfurt, Germany, last year. Andreas Arnold/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Arnold/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Connor Webb and his mother, Kim Webb, stand outside of their home in Huntington Beach, Calif. Connor was treated for a rare cancer at 16. He's well now but his mother is fighting for new cures in case the cancer comes back. Alex Welsh for NPR hide caption

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Alex Welsh for NPR

A drug specialist in the Mexican army shows crystal methamphetamine paste seized at a clandestine laboratory in Mexico's Baja California in August. Much of the meth sold in the U.S. today comes from Mexico, according to DEA officials. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

Methamphetamine Roils Rural Towns Again Across The U.S.

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There's Good News To Be Found — Just Look At A Grain Of Salt

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Paramedic Larrecsa Cox (center) and her quick-response team, including police Officer Stephanie Coffey (left) and Pastor Virgil Johnson (right), check in at the home in Huntington, W.Va., of someone who was revived a few days before from an overdose. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Knocking On Doors To Get Opioid Overdose Survivors Into Treatment

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The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project says the intact shipwreck was discovered at a depth of more than 1 mile, where the scarcity of oxygen helped preserve the ancient vessel. Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions hide caption

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Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions