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A new study suggests Risso's dolphins, which are common along the U.S. Pacific Coast, use past experiences to plan their dives for food. Elizabeth Haslam/Flickr hide caption

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Elizabeth Haslam/Flickr

Risso's Dolphin Group

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Artist's rendering of how the first stars in the universe may have looked. N.R.Fuller/National Science Foundation/Nature hide caption

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N.R.Fuller/National Science Foundation/Nature

Did Dark Matter Make The Early Universe Chill Out?

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A study in mice suggests that our brains tell us when to start and stop drinking long before our bodies are fully hydrated. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

Still Thirsty? It's Up To Your Brain, Not Your Body

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Melanie White takes photos of North Atlantic right whales from NOAA's Twin Otter as the plane circles the whales near Savannah. Whale observers and researchers use the photos to identify the whales. Molly Samuel/WABE hide caption

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Molly Samuel/WABE

Researchers Haven't Found A Single Endangered Right Whale Calf Yet This Season

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Fresh and dried yeast. It might not look like much, but it has shaped the way we eat and live, according to a new book. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

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Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images

Barbra Streisand plays with her dog Samantha near her son, Jason Gould (left), and husband, James Brolin, in Paris in 2007. Samantha died last year, but Streisand now has clones of the dog. Philippe Wojazer/Reuters hide caption

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Philippe Wojazer/Reuters

Though Prices Aren't As High As Before, West Texas Enjoys Oil Revival

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Positive pregnancy tests can also be a positive indicator for the future of the economy, according to new research published by The National Bureau of Economic Research. SKXE/Flickr hide caption

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SKXE/Flickr

Erich Berger and Mari Keto have made radioactive jewels, part of their Inheritance Project, that are unwearable by humans — and remain locked in a concrete vault equipped with radiation measurement devices. Courtesy of Erich Berger hide caption

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Courtesy of Erich Berger

Estill sells her cloth and yarn at three separate stores. She hopes to get that number up to nine. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

A man bends with a beautiful hip hinge in Puerta Vallarta, Mexico. Courtesy of Jean Couch hide caption

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Courtesy of Jean Couch

Lost Art Of Bending Over: How Other Cultures Spare Their Spines

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