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Elliot Berman with his team at Solar Power Corporation outside their office and manufacturing facility in Braintree, Mass., in 1973. John Perlin, author of Let it Shine: The 6,000-Year Story of Solar Energy, credits Berman with planting the flag of solar photovoltaics throughout the world. Solar Power Corporation via John Perlin hide caption

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Solar Power Corporation via John Perlin

How Big Oil Of The Past Helped Launch The Solar Industry Of Today

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After finishing up some household chores, Brody Knapp gets a chance to play with his mother, Ashley, at their home in Kansas City, Mo. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First

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U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds. R.Tsubin/Getty Images hide caption

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R.Tsubin/Getty Images

Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age

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A prototype of SpaceX's Starship stands at the company's Texas launch facility on Saturday. The Starship spacecraft is a massive vehicle designed to eventually be able to take people to the moon, Mars and beyond. Loren Elliott/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/Getty Images

A team of scientists used a telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory in Spain to detect a gas giant orbiting a tiny red star some 30 light-years from Earth. Baback Tafreshi/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Baback Tafreshi/Science Source/Getty Images

A Peculiar Solar System Has Scientists Rethinking Theories Of How Planets Form

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Triathletes who trained too much chose immediate gratification over long-term rewards, researchers found. Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images

Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains

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A selection of small feeding vessels dating back to the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age. Researchers now say vessels like these were used as prehistoric baby bottles. Katharina Rebay-Salisbury hide caption

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Katharina Rebay-Salisbury

Recipients of the 2019 MacArthur fellowships, otherwise known as the "genius" grants. (Two of this year's fellows declined photographs.) John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Salmon swim upstream in Seattle in 2017. A mass of abnormally warm water off the west coast of the U.S. that year contributed to a federal fishery disaster. Warming oceans and rising sea levels are threatening coastal economies as the world's climate changes. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Earth's Oceans Are Getting Hotter And Higher, And It's Accelerating

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Ruby Johnson, whose daughter was recently hospitalized with a respiratory illness from vaping, testified before a House Oversight subcommittee hearing on lung disease and e-cigarettes on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

If E-Cigs Were Romaine Lettuce, They'd Be Off The Shelf, Vaper's Mom Tells Congress

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Environmental Protection Agency administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks during a television interview in front of the West Wing of the White House, on Sept. 19, 2019. Wheeler has threatened to withdraw billions of dollars in federal highway money unless California clears a backlog of air pollution control plans. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

An employee of the Boston biotech company Ginkgo Bioworks runs a gene sequencing machine through its paces. The company synthesizes thousands of genes a month, which are then inserted into cells that become mini factories of useful products. Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks hide caption

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Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder

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