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Sandra Joyce, the head of global intelligence at the cybersecurity firm FireEye, speaks at the company's Cyber Defense Summit in 2018. Private tech companies are increasingly taking the lead in reporting information about suspected attacks by foreign actors. In some cases, the companies sell their reports to the U.S. intelligence community. Courtesy of FireEye hide caption

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Courtesy of FireEye

Tech Companies Take A Leading Role In Warning Of Foreign Cyber Threats

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The phone of Jeff Bezos allegedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account held by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Bandar Algaloud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Bandar Algaloud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

This chicken from Memphis Meats was produced with cells taken from an animal and grown into meat in a "cultivator." The process is analogous to how yeast is grown in breweries to produce beer. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

The phone of Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO and owner of The Washington Post, reportedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account owned by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

U.N. Urges Probe Of Reported Hacking Of Jeff Bezos' Phone By Saudi Arabia

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Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

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Intelligence Community Threats Executive Shelby Pierson told NPR that more nations may attempt more types of interference in the United States. "This isn't a Russia-only problem," she says. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

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Kisha Ravi/NPR

Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse

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Experts say Iran may retaliate for the killing of Qassem Soleimani, its top military leader, with cyberattacks on American companies. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Iran Conflict Could Shift To Cyberspace, Experts Warn

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Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her house on her way to a court appearance on Friday in Vancouver, Canada. The U.S. government has accused Meng of fraud. Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

A team of Stanford University researchers designed the PigeonBot. Lentink Lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Lentink Lab/Stanford University

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight

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Dating apps, including Tinder, give sensitive information about users to marketing companies, according to a Norwegian study released Tuesday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Precinct leaders across Iowa will use their own smartphones to transmit the results of next month's Iowa caucuses. JGI/Tom Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images hide caption

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JGI/Tom Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images

Despite Election Security Fears, Iowa Caucuses Will Use New Smartphone App

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Russian hackers successfully infiltrated emails of employees at Burisma Holdings, a Ukrainian energy company, according to a U.S. security firm. Here, a building is seen in Kyiv that holds the offices of a Burisma subsidiary. Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters hide caption

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Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters

Russians Hacked Ukrainian Firm At The Center Of Impeachment

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Two competing data firms, BuzzAngle and Nielsen Music, released reports in early Jan. 2020 detailing the many changes in listening over the past decade. Kirsty Lee / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Kirsty Lee / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

DMV offices around the U.S. were slowed down for hours on Monday, due to a network outage in a key database. Here, people wait at the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles office in Brooklyn last month. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Grounded Boeing 737 Max airplanes crowd a parking area in Seattle in June. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Boeing Employees Mocked FAA In Internal Messages Before 737 Max Disasters

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Facebook says it will continue to allow political ads to be targeted to only small groups of its users. Here, Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg is seen visiting Congress for a hearing last October. Erin Scott/Reuters hide caption

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Erin Scott/Reuters