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Adrian Lamo (center) walks out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., where Chelsea Manning's court-martial was held, on Dec. 20, 2011. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Mysterious Death Of The Hacker Who Turned In Chelsea Manning

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces the company's climate initiative Thursday at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Amazon hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Amazon

Amazon Makes 'Climate Pledge' As Workers Plan Walkout

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China isn't just the biggest trading partner of the United States. The head of the Justice Department's National Security Division says it's also the biggest counterintelligence threat. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

People Are Looking At Your LinkedIn Profile. They Might Be Chinese Spies

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Richard Stallman, pictured in 2015, resigned from his posts as president of the Free Software Foundation and visiting scientist at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

NASA's Dragonfly mission will hop across Saturn's moon Titan, taking samples and photos. Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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Johns Hopkins APL

Meet The Nuclear-Powered Self-Driving Drone NASA Is Sending To A Moon Of Saturn

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MuralNet CEO Mariel Triggs installs broadband equipment on the Havasupai reservation. Tribal members Travis Hamibreek and Ophelia Watahomigie-Corliss can see the Wi-Fi signal on their phones. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Most Isolated Tribe In Continental U.S. Gets Broadband

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Philip Connors has spent 17 summers as a fire lookout in the Gila National Forest. Lookouts are the eyes in the forest, even as the forests they watch have changed, shaped by developers, shifting land management policies and climate change. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Microsoft President Brad Smith says governments need to set rules for big technology companies. "Almost no technology has gone so entirely unregulated, for so long, as digital technology," he says. Gary He/Reuters hide caption

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Gary He/Reuters

Microsoft President: Democracy Is At Stake. Regulate Big Tech

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Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, on a video link in Moscow, speaks to the crowd on a giant screen at festival in Roskilde, Denmark, in 2016. "You are being watched all the time and you have no privacy," Snowden said. Melissa Kuhn Hjerrild/AP hide caption

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Melissa Kuhn Hjerrild/AP

Edward Snowden appears on a live video feed broadcast from Moscow at an event sponsored by the ACLU Hawaii in Honolulu on Feb. 14, 2015. Marco Garcia/AP hide caption

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Marco Garcia/AP

Edward Snowden Tells NPR: The Executive Branch 'Sort Of Hacked The Constitution'

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Lyft is under growing pressure to strengthen background checks and adopt better security measures for passengers after dozens of women reported that they had been sexually assaulted by drivers. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lawsuits Say Lyft Doesn't Do Enough To Protect Women From Predatory Drivers

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Delphine Lee/NPR

To Prevent School Shootings, Districts Are Surveilling Students' Online Lives

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Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez speaks at a July rally for independent contractors in Sacramento, Calif. The measure that passed Tuesday in the state Senate requires companies such as Lyft and Uber to turn many contract workers into employees. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

The headquarters of the military intelligence agency GRU in Moscow. The FBI and other U.S. agencies want to stop more interference like that launched from here against the U.S. in 2016. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

With Next Goal To Secure 2020 Elections, Feds Seek To Absorb Lessons From 2016

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