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A new lawsuit alleges Facebook is misleading advertisers, but the company says it can't guarantee that all ads will reach their intended targets. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Does Facebook Really Work? People Question Effectiveness Of Ads

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Jeff Williams, Apple's chief operating officer, speaks about the new Apple Watch Series 4 at the company's product-launch event in Cupertino, Calif., on Wednesday. The new Watch includes a sensor allowing users to take an electrocardiogram they can share with their doctor. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

Gary Wagner, a blind Buffalo resident and subscriber to an app that connects him to a shopping assistant, looks for hot sauce at a Wegmans store in Amherst, New York. Ronald Peralta/WBFO hide caption

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Ronald Peralta/WBFO

An Apple-1 circuit board is rigged up to a vintage keyboard and monitor. The board is one of only 200 manufactured in 1976. RR Auction hide caption

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RR Auction

6-Figure Price Tag Expected For Rare Apple-1 Computer At Auction

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An election official holds an electronic voting machine memory card following the Georgia primary runoff elections at a polling location in Atlanta on July 24, 2018. A group of Georgia voters is suing the state, saying that the electronic machines are not secure. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Federal Court Asked To Scrap Georgia's 27,000 Electronic Voting Machines

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A nearly 2,000-foot-long tube is towed offshore from San Francisco Bay on Saturday. It's a giant garbage collector and the brainchild of 24-year-old Boyan Slat, who aims to remove 90 percent of ocean plastic by 2040. The Ocean Cleanup hide caption

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The Ocean Cleanup

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey testify during a Senate intelligence committee hearing on Sept. 5. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Health workers form a human chain reading "SOS" during a protest for the lack of medicines, medical supplies and poor conditions in hospitals, in Caracas on Aug. 2. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

For Many In Venezuela, Social Media Is A Matter Of Life And Death

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In the documentary Swiped, filmmaker Nancy Jo Sales investigates how dating apps have created unintended consequences in actual relationships. Courtesy of HBO hide caption

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Courtesy of HBO

A Documentary Swipes Left On Dating Apps

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