World News and International Headlines NPR world news, international art and culture, world business and financial markets, world economy, and global trends in health, science and technology. Subscribe to the World Story of the Day podcast and RSS feed.

Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) sits beside Vice President Pence, who talks to U.S. national security adviser John Bolton (left) during the 13th East Asian Summit in Singapore on Thursday. Anton Raharjo/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anton Raharjo/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

People who are sensitive to the bitterness of caffeine tend to drink more coffee than others, while people sensitive to bitter flavors like quinine drink less coffee, according to a new study. Dimitri Otis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dimitri Otis/Getty Images

A security officer's shadow marked the door of Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul. The top Saudi prosecutor now says journalist and U.S. resident Jamal Khashoggi was murdered at the diplomatic facility. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Khashoggi Case Update: Saudi Prosecutor Says 5 Suspects Should Be Executed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668162272/668190868" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mir, a Pakistani man who used to live in Xinjiang, China, clutches the hands of his two daughters. Since Chinese authorities detained his wife, he's been raising their two girls alone. "My mind just won't work," he says. "I sound incoherent, I can't think, I even forget what to say in my prayers." Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Diaa Hadid/NPR

'My Family Has Been Broken': Pakistanis Fear For Uighur Wives Held In China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/661788176/668135850" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

British Prime Minister Theresa May faces the difficult task of persuading skeptical Brits to get on board with a tentative agreement with European Union negotiators. Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

In this 1933 photo released by Alexander Historical Auctions, Adolf Hitler embraces Rosa Bernile Nienau at his mountainside Bavarian retreat in Germany. The photograph is inscribed by Hitler himself in dark blue ink. Heinrich Hoffmann/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Heinrich Hoffmann/AP

Eritrea's President Isaias Afwerki, Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, and Somalia's President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed (left to right) photographed after cutting the ribbon at a hospital inauguration in northern Ethiopia, on November 10, 2018. On Wednesday, the U.N. Security Counsel voted to lift sanctions on Eritrea as relations warm between the once-rival nations. Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images

A malnourished child receives medical treatment in Sanaa, Yemen. Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images

Why A 'War On Children' In Yemen Could Get Worse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/667805263/667936333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the Sri Lankan parliament shout slogans in support of former Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe during a parliament session in Colombo on Wednesday that ousted his successor, Mahinda Rajapaksa. Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence and Myanmar State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi arrive for a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit in Singapore on Wednesday. Bernat Armangue/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bernat Armangue/AFP/Getty Images

Gert Berliner's toy monkey has traveled far and wide: from Berlin to Sweden, with long periods in New York and stints in Italy and New Mexico before finally winding up in Berlin again. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Gert Berliner's Swedish ID card with which he eventually entered the U.S. in 1947. He lived in Berlin until he was 14 years old. Gert escaped the Nazi death camps because his parents got him on a children's transport to Sweden in 1939. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Gert Berliner packed this toy monkey in a suitcase when he fled for his life nearly 80 years ago. It's now part of the collection at the Jewish Museum Berlin. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jacobia Dahm for NPR

A Toy Monkey That Escaped Nazi Germany And Reunited A Family

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/663059048/667936315" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A soldier carries marijuana plants to be destroyed after a large plantation was seized in Hostotipaquillo, Mexico, in 2012. A new bill in Mexico's Congress would legalize pot, and with its authors' party in the majority, it is likely to pass. Bruno Gonzalez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bruno Gonzalez/AP

Mexico Looks To Be Next To Legalize Marijuana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/667699301/667699302" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Retired Gen. John Abizaid was the top U.S. commander in the Middle East as head of Central Command from July 2003 to March 2007. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

A group of mostly LGBT Central American migrants are the first to reach northern Mexico. On Sunday about 80 of them arrived in Tijuana. They plan to apply for asylum as early as Thursday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rodrigo Abd/AP

Pro-European Union protesters demonstrate against Brexit outside the House of Parliament on Tuesday in London, as Prime Minister Theresa May was reaching an agreement with the EU. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jack Taylor/Getty Images

U.K. And EU Finally Agree On Brexit Text, But It's Already Getting Slammed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/667544749/667544750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators gather Tuesday to protest Brexit outside Parliament in London. They wave the Union Jack and the flag of the European Union. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jack Taylor/Getty Images

The circles on the map pinpoint the location of thousands of Chinese-funded development projects. The bigger the circle, the bigger the investment. The largest circles represent projects in the multibillion-dollar range. Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR