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Andreas Kalbitz, an AfD leader in Brandenburg, speaks to supporters after exit poll results in state elections on Sept. 1 in Werder, Germany. Michele Tantussi/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Tantussi/Getty Images

Far Right Makes Gains In 2 German State Elections As Centrists Hang Onto Power

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Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old leader of a global protest against inaction on climate change, marched at a rally in New York City Friday. Around the world, millions of other people joined her. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the media Thursday in Winnipeg, Canada, regarding photos in which he is seen wearing dark makeup. John Woods/Getty Images hide caption

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A computer illustration of the virus that causes smallpox. The virus was eradicated in 1980, but live samples are kept in two known labs for research. Science Artwork/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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A cargo container is rocked by waves as Hurricane Humberto hits Hamilton, Bermuda, on Wednesday, in this still picture obtained from social media video. Alexandre Dowling /Social Media via Reuters hide caption

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Alexandre Dowling /Social Media via Reuters

A protester holds a poster reading "Free Yegor Zhukov!" during an August rally in Moscow, after mass police detentions. He was arrested in Moscow on Aug. 1. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, on Wednesday. Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have both agreed to join a U.S.-led maritime contingent to protect shipping in and near the Strait of Hormuz. Mandel Ngan/AP hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AP

A photograph taken by the commercial satellite company Planet shows the Abqaiq facility shortly after an attack on Sept. 14. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

What We Know About The Attack On Saudi Oil Facilities

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Kendieth Russell Roberts and her 5-year-old son Malachai are living with her sister in Florida. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Bahamians Who Fled Dorian Face An Uncertain Future In U.S.

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China isn't just the biggest trading partner of the United States. The head of the Justice Department's National Security Division says it's also the biggest counterintelligence threat. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

People Are Looking At Your LinkedIn Profile. They Might Be Chinese Spies

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President Trump with his new national security adviser, Robert O'Brien, on Wednesday in Los Angeles. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Once A 'Rocket Ship,' National Security Council Now Avoided By Government Pros

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Saudi Arabia's military displays what it says is wreckage from drones and cruise missiles used to attack Saudi Aramco oil facilities. A Saudi spokesman says the weapons did not come from Yemen, as a rebel group has claimed, but from Iran. Vivian Nereim/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Vivian Nereim/Bloomberg via Getty Images